The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

Make apps, not more rules

John Stephenson
Contributor
              Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., left, and Federal Trade Commission Chairman Jon Leibowitz, right, confer at the start of a meeting on the new Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, COPPA, which regulates Internet websites that collect information from children under the age of thirteen, on Capitol Hill  in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Policymakers interested in creating more jobs for Americans should let mobile application developers do what they do best, not saddle them with new, burdensome regulatory obligations.

Getting Broadband to All

1:09 PM 10/18/2012

Our economy and future prosperity depend on broadband, and recent developments show us how to get there.

San Francisco needs to reach out and touch reality on mobile phone radiation

2:19 PM 11/14/2011

Paul Kanter, a musician who helped found the pioneering psychedelic rock band Jefferson Airplane and a native of San Francisco, once said: “San Francisco is 49 square miles surrounded by reality.” There is a lot of evidence to back up Kanter’s statement. San Francisco has devised new ways to impose taxes on hotels. The city has also not been shy about regulating everything within its jurisdiction, from mandating composting to declaring a complete ban of McDonald’s Happy Meals. But nothing proves Kanter’s point more than San Francisco’s mobile phone labeling law.

A New Year’s resolution the states can’t afford to break

6:42 PM 01/25/2011

The month of January is almost gone, and with it more than a few Americans’ New Year’s resolutions to live healthier lifestyles through diet and exercise. Regrettable as this may be, newly-elected leaders face a different set of resolutions that they must make and cannot afford to break. Namely, they must resolve to live healthier financial lifestyles by consuming fewer tax dollars and more actively pursuing budget reform to address government’s growing waistline before it’s too late.