Politics

The most amusing parts of Christine O’Donnell’s book

Alex Pappas Political Reporter

Remember Christine O’Donnell? The candidate who was NOT a witch and is just like you.

She’s back.

The 2010 Republican U.S. Senate candidate from Delaware is promoting her new memoir titled “Trouble Maker,” a reference to Time magazine’s description of her during her tumultuous campaign.

The Daily Caller combed through the 385-page book, which was released Tuesday. These four parts of the book amused us the most:

O’Donnell says the lowest moment of her 2010 campaign was all the witch talk.

Old video surfaced during the campaign of O’Donnell telling liberal television host Bill Maher on “Politically Incorrect” that she once dabbled in witchcraft when she was younger. O’Donnell said the media’s relentless coverage of the old comment immediately put the campaign on the defensive. “We went from autopilot to damage control in a flash — over a nothing comment on a non-issue, made when I was hardly a factor on the political scene,” O’Donnell reflected.

O’Donnell says she hated the subsequent “I’m not a witch” campaign ad.

Responding to the media frenzy over the “dabbling” comments, Republican media strategist Fred Davis developed a campaign commercial for O’Donnell’s campaign meant to help her relate to voters. In the ad, she speaks directly to the camera, saying: “I’m not a witch … I’m you.”

But O’Donnell wrote in her book that she despised the advertisement from the beginning — and knew in her gut it wasn’t a good move. She was further outraged when it was leaked to the media before she saw the final cut.

O’Donnell called being lampooned on Saturday Night Live a “badge of honor.”

In the skit, actress Kristen Wiig, playing O’Donnell, said Delaware voters deserve a candidate for “the human Senate” who can prove they are not a witch. “It was a badge of honor,” O’Donnell recalled, “folks were saying, to be lampooned by Saturday Night Live, and I could now join the ranks of presidents and other world leaders.”

Al Franken once called O’Donnell the girl you “hate to love.”

O’Donnell recalls in her book the love Franken, the former comedian and now U.S. Senator from Minnesota, had for her when they appeared together on Politically Incorrect back in the nineties. O’Donnell said Franken expressed these sentiments to her when they were off-air. But she says Franken “got over” this, as he “dutifully campaigned against me.”