Opinion

The UK’s Political Establishment Is Still Failing Rape Victims

Ryan Girdusky Political Consultant

The story of the thousands of young, mostly white girls who were raped by British-born Pakistani Muslims has just become more grotesque. A government report issued last week by British social welfare official Louise Casey into the rapes found that the Rotherham council attempted to cover up evidence and represented an overall failure of leadership. Just days after that damming report, Rotherham’s Labour MP, Sarah Champion, said “I’m getting new victims coming to me on a weekly basis.” She went on to say Muslim gangs may have assaulted as many as a million girls in the UK.

Sky News spoke to a Rotherham victim who said she sees her abusers “driving young girls in their cars, “untouchable,” and that the abuse is “still going on if not worse, because now they’re having to hide it more.” Sky News also said the authorities had known about hundreds more cases of sexual abuse last August, when Professor Alexis Jay issued her report about the rapes, and that hundreds more are still being reported.

Despite the outcry in the British media at the time of the Jay Report, the rapes continue. The UK’s political correctness has prevented it from tackling the issue properly.

According to the Casey Report, the council did not act on the claims of sexual molestation, child abuse, and rape “for fear of appearing racist.” The report also detailed how quite a few victims believed the police did not act on their claims for fear of being accused of being racist.

Jay’s report had found that more than 1,400 girls, some as young as eleven, had been sexually exploited by Muslim gangs. It said they “were raped by multiple perpetrators, trafficked to other towns and cities in the north of England, abducted, beaten, and intimidated.

“There were examples of children who been doused in petrol and threatened with being set alight, threatened with guns, made to witness brutally violent rapes and threatened they would be next if they told anyone.”

A similar story unfolded in nearby Rochdale, where police arrested nine Muslim men for sexually abusing dozens of young girls in 2012. The rapes were brutal; one teen recounted at a trial being raped by two men while she was “so drunk she was vomiting over the side of the bed.” Overall there were 631 documented cases over a five-year period.

These cases of pedophilia, rape, and sexual abuse were well known to police and social services long before the reports and the arrests. In 2008, one of the Rochdale victims, then 15, went to the police and social workers providing DNA evidence to back up her story of being gang-raped. Twice the police refused to prosecute. She continued to be raped by up to five men a night, four or five nights a week. Rotherham police received 157 reports in 2013 concerning sexual exploitation though the police were receiving evidence dating back to 2002, all of which was ignored or suppressed.

The government has failed these girls because it’s racially and culturally inconvenient to help them. The rapists are Muslim, and the majority of the victims are white. In the UK, racial sensitivity is so high that the mere accusation of racism could end a public servant’s career. And the political class promotes political correctness and multiculturalism at any cost.

Immediately after the Rochdale case came to light, politicians appeared to care more about protecting political correctness more than their citizens. MP Keith Vaz denounced the rapes as “appalling” but followed by saying it was important not to “stigmatize an entire community” and believed the girls were not the target of abuse because they were white: “I don’t think this has anything to do with race.”

The MP’s statements were the total opposite of those by Equalities and Human Rights Commission chief Trevor Phillips, who said anyone “who says that the fact that most of the men are Asian and most of the children are white is not relevant” is being fatuous. Yet Nazir Afzal, the chief crown prosecutor, who is Muslim himself, defended some of the immigrants, saying they bring “cultural baggage” with them from misogynistic societies.

After two investigations and the comments by Phillips and Afzal, it could not be clearer that political correctness is putting every girl in the UK at risk. Moreover, political correctness has become a tool for predators to use against the most vulnerable citizens. Cloaked behind ideas of tolerance and multicultural unity, political correctness is failing the girls of the United Kingdom like it failed the Jews in France.

Even today, more girls are being victimized, yet their abusers are still walking free as  the politically correct fear of discussing racism as a two-way street keeps politicians and institutions from doing anything about it.