Video

Chinese Rappers Think This Music Video Is Going Stop The US Missile Shield In Korea [VIDEO]

REUTERS/ Jason Lee

Daily Caller News Foundation logo
Ryan Pickrell China/Asia Pacific Reporter
Font Size:

China’s patriotic youth have found a new way to protest U.S. military deployments.

Chinese rappers from Chengdu, members of the group CD Rev, have released a music video criticizing the the deployment of a U.S. Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system in South Korea, reports the New York Times.

In recent months, Chinese consumers have boycotted South Korean companies and products, harmed the South’s tourism industry through reduced travel, and even rejected certain aspects of the Korean entertainment industry. Despite these pressures, the THAAD deployment is already underway, but these rappers believe their music video could help change that.

WATCH:

“How many times do I have to warn you my lovely little neighbor, boy?” the rappers ask, referring to South Korea. “You don’t really want that little toy. You know your big brother’s annoyed.”

The group accuses that South of trying to “install a camera in my room.” Beijing claims that THAAD’s X-band radar has the ability to peer into Chinese territory, threatening their national security.

“What’s THAAD? Terminal what? … It ain’t gonna terminate your problems,” the young rappers explain in their song. They also take a swing at the U.S.-South Korea alliance, asking, “Why not choose us rather than Uncle Sam?”

Inspired by American hip-hop artists like Dr. Dre and Eminem, CD Rev has also released other patriotic music videos about a variety of issues, like the South China Sea.

The THAAD deployment process began in March after North Korea fired a salvo of four extended-range Scuds into the East Sea/Sea of Japan. The system is operational and has initial intercept capability. It will, however, be several more months before THAAD is fully operational.

The missile shield is designed to protect U.S. allies from a North Korean ballistic missile strike.

Follow Ryan on Twitter

Send tips to ryan@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.