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What’s Wrong With A Military Parade Anyways?

REUTERS/Yuri Gripas.

Jena Greene Reporter
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President Trump made headlines this week after reports surfaced that the Commander In Chief wants to host a parade to celebrate our military this year.

According to a report by the Washington Post, President Trump discussed the idea at the Pentagon this January with top military officials Defense Secretary Mattis and Joint Chiefs Chairman Dunford.

“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America’s great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe,” Sarah Huckabee Sanders said of the matter. “He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation.”

The horror. Trump really went off the deep end with this one. A military parade? In the United States Of America? Is he kidding? Our President must really be a sick man.

That’s at least how prominent American leftists seem to feel about it. CNN’s Washington Correspondent Jake Tapper said he was having trouble finding people in support of the military parade.

Bernie Sanders couldn’t have been less enthused about the idea.

NBC writer Nick Jack Pappas suggested a military would be met with an unprecedentedly large protest.

I can’t be the only person who thinks these takes are certifiably insane. It used to be that, although Americans disagreed on day to day politics, there was one thing that we could all find a sense of pride in: our military. We’d all put our hands over our heart during the National Anthem and we’d all find the time to thank a person in uniform for his or her service. For protecting our right to debate, progress, and think freely. Now even this is a bipartisan issue.

Maybe I’m biased. I was born into a military family and spent a chunk of my childhood living on base. From a young age, I was taught about the sanctity of our military. I went to air shows, demonstrations, and yes – parades. A pressed uniform hanging in the closet and combat boots on the floor was a daily sight for me. I shared my Marine father with countless training missions, drills, and deployments.

Even as a young girl, I knew my family had to be prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice for the good of the country.

And when that day came in July 2004, when my father laid down his life in the name of the brave Iraqi freedom fighters, Americans, the US military, and his family, I didn’t question it. My family didn’t protest the elaborate service he received at Arlington. We didn’t question how much money, time, and effort went in to supporting surviving soldiers. We dug in. We supported the armed services with even more pride, wholly aware of the sacrifice that every single military member makes on a daily basis.

A parade celebrating our men and women in uniform is the least we can do to thank them.

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