Politics

North Carolinians Vote To Require Voter ID

Jiri Flogel/Shutterstock

Jon Brown Associate Editor

The citizens of North Carolina voted in favor of an amendment to their state constitution that would require photo ID before voting. Fifty-six percent voted for the proposal, at the time of reporting.

Unlike some other states, which allow exemptions for those who object to being photographed for religious or financial reasons, North Carolina will not be required to make exceptions. (RELATED: Missouri Judge Says Voters No Longer Need Photo Identification To Cast Vote)

Residents of Mecklenburg County in Charlotte, North Carolina cast their ballots on November 6, 2018. (Photo by Logan Cyrus / AFP)

Residents of Mecklenburg County in Charlotte, North Carolina cast their ballots on November 6, 2018. (Photo by Logan Cyrus / AFP)

The amendment was one of six on the North Carolina ballot this election cycle. As reported by the Asheville Citizen-Times, voters also passed amendments “to protect the right to hunt and fish,” “to strengthen the rights of crime victims” and “to lower the maximum income tax rate from 10 percent to 7 percent.” (RELATED: Former AG Loretta Lynch: Voter ID Laws Are Meant To ‘Scare People Away’ From The Process)

Voters rejected amendments “to move some power to fill judicial vacancies from the governor to the legislature” and “to move some power to choose officials in charge of elections from the governor to the legislature.”

The state Democratic Party was against all proposed constitutional amendments.

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