Politics

Bernie Sanders Tells Supporters That Biden Wants ‘To Buy This Election’

REUTERS

David Krayden Ottawa Bureau Chief

In a fundraising pitch to supporters on Friday, Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders warned that former Vice President Joe Biden is “trying to buy this election” with his host of wealthy donors.

Sanders referred to a Thursday New York Times article, “Anxious Biden Allies May Unleash Super PAC,” and claimed that Biden was appealing to the richest Americans to propel him victory in the presidential nomination race.

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders addresses striking United Auto Workers (UAW) and supporters in Hamtramck, Michigan, U.S. September 25, 2019. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders addresses striking United Auto Workers (UAW) and supporters in Hamtramck, Michigan, U.S. Sept. 25, 2019. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

“It should not be a surprise that wealthy donors of the political establishment are trying to buy this election,” Sanders wrote in one of his regular fundraising emails to his campaign followers, obtained by the Washington Examiner. “Now we need to be ready for when they do.” (RELATED: Bernie Sanders’ Campaign Embraces War With Democratic Establishment) 

Sanders prides himself on collecting small donations from the multitudes rather than appealing to large corporations for money. His campaign emails routinely ask for just $2.70 from supporters.

“Super PACs can raise and spend unlimited amounts of money to promote or attack candidates,” the email read. “They are a threat to our democracy. And frankly, they are a threat to our campaign and our hopes to transform our country.”

Sanders has proven the success of this fundraising strategy not only in his nomination run this year but in his unsuccessful campaign to become the Democratic standard bearer in 2016 that he lost to Hillary Clinton.

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders stand together during a campaign rally where Sanders endorsed Clinton in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, U.S., July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders stand together during a campaign rally where Sanders endorsed Clinton in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, U.S., July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

After announcing his presidential candidacy in February, Sanders raised a whopping $10 million in his first week of campaigning. By the end of the first quarter he managed to raise $18.2 million, outstripping all of his competitors. The second quarter left Sanders with another $18 million.

Hoping to incite a backlash from Sanders loyalists, the self-described Democratic socialist appealed to his blue-collar base, urging them to initiate a “political revolution.” (RELATED: Joe Biden Holds Fundraiser In $34 Million NYC Penthouse)

“The antidote to a super PAC is a political revolution funded by working people, chipping in what they can,” he said. “We are the only campaign that is entirely funded by grassroots donations from start to finish. And so now we are asking you to chip in what you can before our FEC fundraising deadline.”