Editorial

Angels Employee Reportedly Tells DEA He Provided Tyler Skaggs With Oxycodone

(Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

David Hookstead Smoke Room Editor-in-Chief

An employee of the Los Angeles Angels has reportedly told the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) that he gave pitcher Tyler Skaggs drugs prior to his death.

Angels’ director of communications Eric Kay told the DEA that he provided Skaggs with oxycodone prior to his death, according to ESPN on Saturday. Skaggs was found dead at the start of July while on a road trip with the team in Texas. (RELATED: Los Angeles Angels Pitcher Tyler Skaggs Dies)

 

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Kay also reportedly told federal agents that he doesn’t believe the pills he gave the Angels pitcher were the ones he took before he died because Skaggs would “ingest the pills immediately after receiving them from Kay.”

The Angels director of communications also reportedly told the DEA that he gave drugs to other players, but their names weren’t listed in the ESPN article.

At the time of his death, Tyler Skaggs had fentanyl, oxycodone and alcohol in his system, according to the same ESPN report.

 

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What an absolutely awful situation all the way around. ESPN reported that Kay might not face criminal charges in this case because “it would be difficult to establish exactly whether alcohol or which drugs caused his death.”

 

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It’s never a good thing when an employee of a pro baseball team is allegedly telling federal agents that they provided players with illicit substances.

Skaggs died at the age of 27. People that young aren’t supposed to be dying, especially athletes who are in prime physical shape.

It just goes to show you can never know what’s truly going on in somebody’s head.

 

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We’ll have to wait and see how the DEA and MLB handle this situation, but it’s just tragic all the way around.