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The Details Of Ghislaine Maxwell’s Wild Sex Life Will Be Released Thursday, Judge Orders

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Mary Margaret Olohan Social Issues Reporter
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A federal judge on Tuesday ordered that transcripts be released Thursday containing conversations with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s cohort Ghislaine Maxwell.

The transcripts contain interviews that discuss Maxwell’s former boyfriend, Epstein, as well as details about Maxwell’s prolific sex life, according to the Daily Beast.

District Judge Loretta Preska ordered that these transcripts, containing over 400 pages, be made public by 9 a.m. on Thursday, the publication reported. (RELATED: ‘Would You Mind Taking A Crack At It?’ Photos Show Alleged Epstein Victim Massaging Bill Clinton)

Maxwell’s legal team has previously argued that her depositions should be kept private because they contain “intimate” information about her personal life, according to the Daily Beast, but prosecutors say that Maxwell may have perjured herself during her testimony.

Maxwell was arrested by the FBI at 8:30 a.m. July 2 in Bradford, New Hampshire. A grand jury for the U.S. District Court of Southern New York indicted Maxwell on charges of conspiracy to entice minors to engage in illegal sex acts, conspiracy to transport minors to these illegal sex acts, transportation of a minor to engage in illegal sex acts, and perjury.

U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan denied bail to Maxwell during a virtual hearing in July, saying “the risks are simply too great” to allow her to be released on bail.


Maxwell’s layers later sent a letter August 10 to Nathan saying that Maxwell is being subjected to conditions unequal to her fellow prisoners, adding that her treatment stems from fears over Epstein’s apparent suicide last summer in a New York City jail.

Maxwell’s lawyers said that she is being held “under uniquely onerous conditions,” and that she was isolated from her fellow prisoners, carefully watched through video surveillance and note-taking guards around the clock, CNBC reported.

But the judge denied Maxwell’s request to be transferred to the general inmate population and to have the 24-hour surveillance eased, saying that Maxwell did not provide “any basis for the Court to conclude that the level of surveillance is punitive.”

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