Education

‘She Sucked My D*ck’: Moms Go Thermonuclear Over NSFW Material In Class Reading Assignments

Screenshot of LCPS Video

Harold Hutchison Contributor
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Parents condemned the Loudoun County’s school board during a May 11 meeting over explicit material in reading assignments for high school students.

In a series of videos posted by Ian Prior on Twitter, parents read passages from books, including “Monday’s Not Coming” by Tiffany Jackson, which were apparently assigned to 9th grade students in Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS). This is the same school board meeting where a mother blasted the school system’s use of critical race theory.

“She sucked my d*ck,” a parent read from a text.

Passages from Jackson’s book read by the furious parents included characters discussing oral sex, a female character being beaten and thrown into a closet and a sexual encounter in a classroom. The book “#MurderTrending” by Gretchen McNeil, was also quoted, where a female character discussed the size of a male friend’s genitalia.

“He had a big d*ck,” a parent read in the meeting.

“This is the definition of a hostile work environment,” one parent, holding up a poster featuring a list of LCPS policy violations, told the school board.

Controversy over the use of Critical race theory (CRT) and the re-opening of schools for in-person learning has already embroiled LCPS, including a secret Facebook group reportedly targeting parents who opposed CRT. The move caused a recall campaign targeting six members of the school board.

Critical race theory (CRT) holds that America is fundamentally racist, yet it teaches students to view every social interaction and person in terms of race. Its adherents pursue “antiracism” through the end of merit, objective truth and the adoption of race-based policies. (RELATED: REPORT: School Committee Chair Says Teachers Against Critical Race Theory ‘Cannot And Should Not Be Tolerated’)

The list of books for ninth graders available on the school system’s web site included “Monday’s Not Coming,” but also included books by Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles, Malcolm X, and NBA legend Kareen Abdul-Jabbar.

“I am all for diversity and actually appreciate that aspect the most living in Loudoun County. I grew up in [Alabama] and we simply didn’t have a diverse population there,” Karlee Copland, who has two children in LCPS, told the Daily Caller.

Copland said she objected to “the distribution of child pornography or sexually explicit reading materials in the classroom.”

“My role as a mother is to ensure my children’s innocence is protected for as long as reasonably possible. I take great offense to the school system trying to subvert my role,” she added.

“Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS) reminds parents that if they feel a book is not appropriate for their student, they may request an alternate text be assigned,” a statement forwarded to the Daily Caller by LCPS spokesperson Wayde Byard said.

“There will be no academic penalty for a student should they request an alternate text to fulfill an assignment,” the spokesperson continued.

“If a parent or member of the community feels a book is inappropriate for student use, they may submit a formal request for the Reconsideration of Instructional Materials outlined in School Board Policy 5045.”