Editorial

Porn Company CamSoda Offers Endorsement Deals To College Athletes

David Hookstead Sports And Entertainment Editor
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CamSoda wants to join the era of NIL in college sports.

Porn and NIL seem to be leading news topics over the past few weeks, and the popular cam streaming site wants to get in on the action. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football)

In a Tuesday release from CamSoda, the site announced that it will make NIL deals with athletes interested now that they can sign endorsement deals.

CamSoda vice president Daryn Parker said the following in the release:

It’s a shame it took the NCAA this long to bring about this change. Where was this when Tim Tebow, Reggie Bush, Johnny Manziel, Diana Taurasi, Adam Morrison and so many others were in college? College athletes deserve to make money for their fame and build their brand to be able to set the market and drive pay like we have seen done by the Paul brothers in boxing. Not only will we promote our CamSoda athletes across our social channels, but as part of their partnership with us the athletes can stream themselves live and give fans intimate access to their personal lives. For example, they can break down their recent performance/game tape and provide in-depth, behind-the-scenes insights or hold Q&A sessions. Basically give people what they’ve been clamoring for for many years.

When I asked for which athletes CamSoda would like to specifically sign, Parker told me in a statement:

We’re looking to work alongside some of the nation’s top athletes. We have a devout global audience that we can leverage in our relationship with them to draw eyeballs to them and generate buzz across social. We are not biased and do not have a set criteria for who we are looking to work alongside. They can be SEC football players, Big Ten basketball players or Pac-12 softball players. Come one, come all. We’re open for business.

It’s worth noting that several programs have already banned athletes from signing endorsement deals with adult entertainment companies, including the Alabama Crimson Tide.

When I asked friend of the company Kendra Lust her thoughts on the issue, she made it clear she’s against college athletes signing deals with adult entertainment companies.

The interesting thing here for interested athletes is that they’re not required to do any adult content in order to get a deal.

In fact, the deal only requires them to do stuff they already do every day, such as breaking down tape. All in all, it seems more reasonable than I expected when I first saw the release.

Let us know in the comments if you think athletes should sign deals with adult entertainment companies!