Health

Dr. Makary Says Natural Immunity Is More Effective Than Vaccine Immunity

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Nicole Silverio Contributor
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Dr. Marty Makary, a professor at John Hopkins School of Medicine, during an appearance on The Vince Coglianese Show, said individuals formerly infected with COVID-19 are seven times more likely then vaccinated people to fight off the virus.

“It appears that natural immunity is better against the Delta variant. When you get infected with COVID, your body’s immune system develops antibodies to the entire surface of the virus,” Makary said. “Not just the slight protein that the vaccines gives you, but the entire surface. And so you get a more diverse antibody portfolio in your system.”

Makary said data from Israel revealed that natural immunity appears to be 6.7x more effective than being vaccinated when it comes to fighting off COVID-19.

“One of the great failures of our medical leadership has been ignoring the half of America with natural immunity, which is the half of non-vaccinated folks.” (RELATED: Why Isn’t ‘Natural Immunity’ A Consideration? These Scientists Are Downright Mad)

A woman gets his first dose of AstraZeneca vaccine at a walk-in COVID-19 clinic inside a Buddhist temple in the Smithfield suburb of Sydney on August 4, 2021. (Photo by Saeed KHAN / AFP) (Photo by SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman gets her first dose of AstraZeneca vaccine at a walk-in COVID-19 clinic inside a Buddhist temple in the Smithfield suburb of Sydney on August 4, 2021. (Photo by Saeed KHAN / AFP) (Photo by SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images)

Host Vince Coglianese said that the government likely does not share this data because “they’re scared that people are going to try and take the risk.”

Makary has still encouraged those who are not vaccinated and not immune to get the vaccine.


Studies conducted by researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that cells in the bone marrow of those who recovered from COVID a year earlier had a memory of the virus. Another study showed that the cells continue to mature 12-months after the individual contracted the virus.

Dr. William Hanage, an associate professor of epidemiology at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said that it is “impossible” to know whether the COVID vaccine or natural immunity is more protective against the virus due to the lack of knowledge regarding the level of protection natural immunity gives a person over time. Reinfection occurs in about 10% of people after having contracted the virus as a result of a decrease in immunity overtime.