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Report Floats New Theory Behind Titanic Sinking

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Ted Goodman Reporter

The most infamous sinking in modern history may have been caused by an enormous fire, not an iceberg, according to new evidence published by journalist Senan Molony.

It has been over 100 years since the R.M.S. Titanic sank to the bottom of the North Atlantic on April 15, 1912, and new evidence suggests that a massive fire in the ship’s bunker may have weakened the ship’s hull well before its well documented collision with an iceberg.

1997 cinematic portrayal of the R.M.S. Titanic’s collision with an iceberg (YouTube.)

Molony, who has researched the sinking of the Titanic for 30 years, says that a fire in the ship’s bunker may have played a “far greater role” in the ship’s demise than previously believed.

According to Molony, photographs taken by the ship’s engineer before its maiden voyage, reveal 30 foot black marks across the ships hull, near where the iceberg struck the ocean liner. Experts have said that the marks were likely to have been caused by a fire in the three story high fuel store behind one of the ships’s boiler rooms.

The fire may have reached 1000 degrees Celsius, which would weaken the ship’s lining enough to be torn open, according to experts. Officers were told to not mention the fire to passengers, under strict orders from Bruce Ismay, the president of the company that built the Titanic.

“It’s a perfect storm of extraordinary factors coming together: fire, ice and criminal negligence,” Maloney asserted.

More than 1,500 passengers perished when the “unsinkable” Titanic sank on its maiden voyage across the North Atlantic in the spring of 1912.

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Tags : titanic
Ted Goodman