Sports

Adam Silver Rips Social Media, Says Lots Of NBA Players Are ‘Genuinely Unhappy’

(Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)

David Hookstead Smoke Room Editor-in-Chief

NBA commissioner Adam Silver has some golden thoughts on social media, and it’s a message every American should hear.

It’s a known fact that social media plays a bigger role in the NBA than any other sport. The players are all pretty much stars on Instagram with massive followings. It’s unlike any other pro sport. However, Silver made it clear that it hasn’t made players any happier. (RELATED: J.J. Redick Has A Message About Social Media You Need To Hear)

Silver told Bill Simmons the following in the video making the rounds on Twitter Monday:

I think we live a bit in the age of anxiety. I’ve read studies on this. I think part of it is a direct product of social media. I think those players we’re talking about, what strikes me when I meet them, they’re truly unhappy. This is not some show they’re putting on … a lot of these young men are genuinely unhappy.

You can watch the full video segment below.

I’m not sure I’ve ever agreed with anything Silver has ever said more. The sad truth is that he’s 100 percent correct, and I’ve seen it with my own eyes.

Unfortunately, social media causing anxiety doesn’t stop with just pro sports. It’s a problem all over media. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve seen behave one way on social media and then another way in private. It’s actually disturbing. It’s shocking how unhappy most people who chase notoriety on social media truly are deep down.

It’s sad more than anything else. Now to be clear, there are some people with massive followings who are completely normal. Unfortunately, they’re in the minority.

It’s a dangerous game to play when you start chasing affirmation on social media and in make-believe land. That is never going to end well, and it seems like that’s causing some problems in the NBA.

Despite all the money, these guys still aren’t happy. I can’t say for sure why, but I think Silver seems to be heading in the correct direction.

Social media can be a cancer at times, and it’s a cancer way too many seem eager to participate in.

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