Politics

‘Need To Stop’: Paul Ryan Says Trump Must Concede Election

REUTERS/Jim Young

Shawn Waugh Shawn is a practicing Orthopedic Surgery PA. He hosts the 'On The Level: Where Spin Meets Sanity' Podcast. He is married to his beautiful wife, Jade, and they have 5 children.
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Former Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan said Tuesday that it is time for President Donald Trump to concede the 2020 election.

In a speech given at the Bank of America’s virtual European Credit Conference, The Hill reported that Ryan said, “The election is over. The outcome is certain, and I really think the orderly transfer of power — that is one of the most uniquely fundamental American components of our political system.” (RELATED: Trump’s Order To Begin Transition To Biden Admin Isn’t A Concession, Trump Says)

Ryan mentioned in his speech that “the General Services Administration ascertained the election”  and that President-elect Joe Biden should be able to start transitioning.  He went on to specifically mention that the General Services Administration (GSA) attestation was crucial as this solidifies Biden’s team to begin working on issues such as background checks for potential administration personnel as reported by Politico.

Jenna Ellis, a member of the Trump legal team, quickly responded to Ryan’s comments on Twitter.

Although Trump ordered the GSA to “do what needs to be done” to begin the transition process Monday Nov. 23, the White House chief of staff Mark Meadows had reportedly told the staff not to go out of their way to work with Biden’s transition team.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that Ryan also mentioned the legal challenges in the speech saying, “I think maybe even more important is that these legal challenges to the outcome and the attacks on our voting system really need to stop, in my opinion.  The outcome will not be changed, and it will only serve to undermine our faith in our system of government, our faith in our democracy.”

Ryan is one of several other GOP lawmakers to call on Trump to concede the election including his former 2012 presidential running mate, Sen. Mitt Romney according to The Hill.