Politics

Supreme Court Will Lose ‘Legitimacy’ If It Doesn’t Strike Down Abortion Law, Pelosi Says

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday the Supreme Court would lose “legitimacy” if it doesn’t strike down Mississippi’s abortion law.

“As the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, it has the opportunity and responsibility to honor the Constitution, the law and the basic truth: every woman has the constitutional right to basic reproductive health care,” Pelosi said.

“Mississippi’s radical abortion ban, part of a nationwide assault against women’s freedoms targeting in particular women of color and women from low-income communities, is brazenly unconstitutional and designed to destroy Roe v. Wade. Yet again, Republicans are trying to control a woman’s most personal decisions about her body and her family and are trying to criminalize health care professionals for providing reproductive care,” she continued.

“The constitutional right to an abortion has been repeatedly affirmed, and any failure to fully strike down the Mississippi ban would seriously erode the legitimacy of the Court, and the Court itself warned in its ruling in Casey, and question its commitment to the rule of law itself,” Pelosi concluded. (RELATED: ‘What Specifically Is The Right Here?’: Justice Thomas Questions Where In The Constitution Abortion Is Protected)

The court is hearing Dobbs v. Jackson’s Women’s Health Organization which involves Mississippi’s ban on abortions after 15 weeks. The case challenges the precedent that the right to an abortion is protected before fetal viability and the state is asking the high court to overturn Roe v. Wade.

The Supreme Court ruled in 1973 in Roe v. Wade that the Constitution protects a woman’s right to an abortion before the point of fetal viability, 24 to 28 weeks of gestation, while granting states the individual right to prohibit an abortion after the fetus is considered viable, according to the Guttmacher Institute.