DC Trawler

State Department staffers have to mourn their colleagues in Benghazi privately

At this point, either you think Benghazi is important or you don’t. Apparently, some State Dept. employees do, which puts them at odds with their bosses.

Hunter Walker, TPM:

Staffers at State Department headquarters in Washington, D.C. held their own private ceremony Wednesday to commemorate the first anniversary of the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya after finding out the agency would not be organizing a formal, official memorial service…

A State Department staffer who worked with Stevens in Libya and asked not to be named told TPM there were about 20 to 25 staffers at the memorial. The informal gathering was put together after staffers inquired and learned the department would not be holding an official event to mark the anniversary…

“It was very meaningful — we hugged, told stories, laughed, cried. Someone put flowers by the wall, we stood awkwardly, then we went back to work,” the staffer said of the event.

Guess they didn’t know they’re not supposed to care. They missed that memo.

What does it tell you that a State Dept. employee is afraid to reveal his or her identity for daring to talk about mourning fallen colleagues? What did he or she think would happen? It’s sad, and it’s sickening.

In other Benghazi news, Carlo Muñoz at The Hill reports:

The State Department willfully obstructed a congressional investigation of the deadly attack on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi last year, according to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

State Department officials routinely refused requests for documents on its investigation into the September, 2012, attack, including interview transcripts and summaries of eyewitnesses to the attack, according to a committee report obtained by The Hill.

Additionally, members of the independent Accountability Review Board (ARB) tasked with reviewing the events that led up to the Benghazi attack were rife with “actual and perceived conflicts of interest” with State, the House report adds.

Phony scandal. What difference, at this point, does it make? Etc.