Opinion

Christmas Challenge To Leftists: Stop Appropriating Christian Culture

Emily Jashinsky Program Officer, Young America’s Foundation
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The American Left spent a sizable chunk of 2015 shaming everyday people for what they call “cultural appropriation.”

College students were castigated for wearing sombreros on Halloween, teen icon Kylie Jenner’s cornrows were deemed racially insensitive, and progressives debated the validity of banning Westerners from practicing yoga.

The idea behind these complaints is that it’s wrong for members of a “dominant culture” to adopt the practices of a culture they have historically “oppressed.”

In the spirit of this trend, I’m issuing a challenge to my liberal friends—if you don’t believe Jesus Christ is your Savior, don’t skip work on December 25. Don’t put up a Christmas tree. Don’t listen Christmas music. Don’t watch It’s A Wonderful Life.

Christmas is a sacred day for Christians.  

If you regularly mock and denigrate our religion, as many on the left do on a daily basis, don’t celebrate our holiday.

Of course, I welcome sincere participation in Christmas festivities. But I also know the secularization of Christmas has discouraged reflection upon the real reason for the season and suspect many people who actively work against the efforts of Christian values likely take part in Christmas celebrations.

Following the logic of social justice warriors’ rules on cultural appropriation, it’s time somebody holds the Left accountable for this hypocrisy.

[dcquiz] If college students’ decisions to wear sombreros on Halloween constituted “cultural appropriation,” as the Left argued, so does leftists’ decision to take off of work, exchange gifts, hang stockings, listen to Christmas music, and bake cookies.

Liberals should play by their own rules.

I know it’s much sexier to shame white people for enjoying Mexican food, but celebrating Christmas is a deeply spiritual experience for Christians. Christmas is the day our Savior was born.

Think that’s funny?

Take down your tree.