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Before And After Photos: Here’s What Seattle’s ‘CHAZ’ Has Done To The City

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Shelby Talcott Media Reporter
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Seattle’s “Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone” (CHAZ) takes up roughly six blocks and includes the city’s East police precinct.

CHAZ, recently renamed “Capitol Hill Organized Protest” (CHOP), is a no-cop zone that has entry points, a “no cop co-op,” porta potties and more. The Daily Caller had reporters on the ground inside the zone for nearly a week between June 12 – 16, and there are big differences within the area now that it’s run by protesters.

The zone includes Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park, which has tennis courts and an athletic field. Previously used by Seattle residents to enjoy, it has now become an area for meeting and camping for those sleeping inside CHAZ.

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AFTER:

An aerial view of CHAZ after being taken over by protesters shows tents inside the park and a large mural on street. (Credit: Richie McGinniss)

An aerial view of CHAZ after being taken over by protesters shows tents inside the park and a large mural on the street. (Credit: Richie McGinniss)

Within CHAZ is Seattle’s East Precinct, which was abandoned by cops. Occupants often gather in front of the precinct, which has been renamed the “People Department.” (RELATED: EXCLUSIVE VIDEOS: American Flag-Bearing Demonstrators Cause Uproar Within Seattle’s Autonomous Zone)

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AFTER:

Seattle's East Precinct has been taken over by protesters and is inside CHAZ. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

Seattle’s East Precinct has been taken over by protesters and is inside CHAZ. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

CHAZ has numerous entry points that are manned by volunteers. Protesters have put up makeshift barriers to block cars from driving into the area, and some, though not all, of the guards are armed. One popular entry point is seen below.

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Many of the entry points have both barriers and parked cars, as well as guards protecting CHAZ. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

Many of the entry points have both barriers and parked cars, as well as guards protecting CHAZ. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

The corner of East Pine Street and 11th Avenue used to be a regular road for cars as well as an entrance to the park. While the entrance to the park remains, the road was closed off to traffic and a makeshift “conversation cafe” was set up between the sidewalks. The “conversation cafe” has couches and foldable chairs as well as tents.

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The area has been turned into a place for talking and was shut off from cars. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

The area has been turned into a place for talking and was shut off from cars. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

The zone’s “no cop co-op” grew every day while reporters were on the ground. The co-op has food and supplies and no money is allowed. The co-op is manned by volunteers and has everything from feminine hygiene products, protective equipment and fruits and vegetables.

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The "no cop co-op" grew substantially during the five days Daily Caller reporters were on the ground inside CHAZ. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

The “no cop co-op” grew substantially during the five days Daily Caller reporters were on the ground inside CHAZ. (Credit Shelby Talcott)

CHAZ, or CHOP as many now call it, remains – despite a shooting occurring there early Saturday morning. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan previously referred to the area as “more like a block party atmosphere” than an “armed takeover.”

The area has been an issue for some people whose homes are within or around CHAZ. Some residents have temporarily moved out of their homes as occupants continue to have control over the residential area, according to KIRO 7. One man who spoke with the Daily Caller on condition of anonymity said he plans to move out of the city, adding that he is scared every day.