US

Courthouse In Portland Keeps Getting Attacked So City Put Up Barricade Again

Font Size:

Non-scalable fences were erected outside the federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, Sunday after a group of rioters vandalized the building following the removal of the protective barrier.

The Department of Homeland Security confirmed to Fox News that its Federal Protection Services unit would “continue to fulfill its mandate of ensuring the safety and security of federal employees and facilities, while maintaining our commitment to working with the City of Portland and the community as part of a collective effort to restore the downtown area.”

Officials said that the fence, which had been taken down March 11, was just 15 miles out of Portland when the truck was redirected back to the city, The Oregonian reported.

The fences were originally erected during last summer’s protests over the death of George Floyd. During the ensuing months, rioters frequently targeted the Mark O’Hatfield Courthouse, throwing rocks, glass bottles and homemade explosives at the courthouse. Rioters also tore down parts of the fence surrounding the courthouse in other instances. (RELATED: ‘That’s A Myth’: Democrats Downplay The Violence In Portland)

The fences were taken down in a bid to symbolize that the city was returning to normal, federal officials said, according to OPB.

Protesters attacked the federal courthouse Thursday after a protest at Chapman Square in opposition to a new pipeline, The Oregonian reported.

Rioters antagonized individuals inside the courthouse before others began throwing unidentified liquids into the courthouse.

Federal agents were forced to assemble in front of the courthouse and authorities eventually fired “pepper balls” at protesters, according to video posted to Twitter.

Protesters attacked the courthouse again on Saturday, smashing eight courthouse windows and spray painting some of the walls, according to The Oregonian.

The Daily Caller has reached out to the Department of Homeland Security but did not receive a response at the time of publication.