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Some Latinos Worry Getting The COVID-19 Vaccine Will Affect Their Immigration Status, Poll Shows

(Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)

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Some Latino adults are concerned to get a COVID-19 vaccine because they might have to provide identification or are worried it could affect their immigration status, according to a poll released Thursday.

Of the total number of unvaccinated Latino adults who were polled, 39% said they were concerned about potential requirements to provide a government-issued ID or Social Security number to be vaccinated, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation Vaccine Monitor poll. And 35% of respondents expressed concerns that receiving the vaccine could negatively impact their own or a relative’s immigration status.

“Among unvaccinated Hispanic adults, those who are potentially undocumented, those without health insurance, and those with lower household incomes are more likely to express potential access-related barriers or immigration-related concerns to vaccination,” according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Signs in multiple languages let the public know they can get inoculated here at La Colaborativa in Chelsea, Massachusetts on February 16, 2021.  (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

Signs in multiple languages let the public know they can get inoculated here at La Colaborativa in Chelsea, Massachusetts on February 16, 2021.  (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

Over 70% of unvaccinated Latino adults polled said their main concern about receiving the vaccines is that they are not as safe as they are said to be, according to the poll. (RELATED: Illegal Immigrants Repeatedly Denied COVID-19 Vaccine In Florida: Report)

Nearly 80% of respondents expressed concerns about experiencing serious side effects after receiving the vaccine and having to miss work, the poll found. Unvaccinated Latino adults who earn under $40,000 annually were more likely to be worried about missing work, having to pay out-of-pocket for their dose and transportation to a vaccination site.

Unvaccinated Latinos who don’t have insurance said they were more worried about receiving a vaccine from a trustworthy source, having to provide a federal ID or negatively impacting their or a relative’s immigration status than unvaccinated Latinos who have health insurance, according to the poll.

Some Latino respondents said they’ve stopped applying for federal assistance for food, housing or healthcare because of immigration status concerns over the last three years, the poll found.

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