Education

California DOE ‘Recommended Literature List’ Includes Ibram X. Kendi’s ‘Stamped For Kids’

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Reagan Reese Contributor
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The California Department of Education (CDOE) is promoting books on anti-racism including “Stamped For Kids” by Ibram X. Kendi, according to the department’s website.

The “Recommended Literature List” section on the CDOE website is comprised up of 280 book titles selected by teachers and librarians for students from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Recommended books include Ibram X. Kendi’s “Stamped,” and “Stamped for Kids” which teach the history of “racist ideas” and how they impact America today. (RELATED: Michigan Department Of Education Trains Teachers To Hide Students’ Names, Pronouns From Parents)

“Stamped (For Kids): Racism, Anti-Racism and You” by Ibram X. Kendi is suggested for middle schoolers and encourages kids to “stamp out racist thoughts in their own lives,” the website showed. The book includes a chapter on Black Lives Matter and teaches the students to define the terms, segregationist, assimilationist and antiracist.

“Stamped: Racism, Anti-Racism and You” by Ibram X. Kendi is promoted for young adults to learn the origins of their “racist ideas” and “why the poison of racism lingers,” the website stated. The book maps out the “racial politics” of America up until 2016.

Demonstrators holding signs take part in a Black Lives Matter protest in Huntington Beach, California, U.S. April 11, 2021. REUTERS/Ringo Chiu

Demonstrators holding signs take part in a Black Lives Matter protest in Huntington Beach, California, U.S. April 11, 2021. REUTERS/Ringo Chiu

“Ghost Boys” by Jewell Parker Rhodes, also promoted on the CDOE website, is about a 12-year-old black boy who is killed by a police officer because he thought his toy gun was a real gun, according to the website. The story description lists the book as a way to help “understand American blackness.”

The CDOE also recommends “Genesis Begins Again” by Alicia D. Williams, the story of a black girl and her family in Detroit, the website stated. The girl is called names in school such as “Charcoal” and when her father is under the influence of alcohol, he tells his daughter he wishes she was “light-skinned like her mother.”

The CDOE did not immediately respond to the Daily Caller News Foundation’s request for comment.

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