Politics

Prosecutor Ignored Apparent ‘Campaign Finance Criminal Violations’ Flagged By IRS Whistleblower, Memo Shows

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James Lynch Investigative Reporter
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IRS whistleblower Gary Shapley wrote a memo in May 2021 flagging potential “criminal violations” related to campaign finances that Department of Justice (DOJ) prosecutors allegedly ignored during the investigation into Hunter Biden’s taxes and firearms possession.

Shapley on May 3, 2021, wrote to his chain of command that Delaware Assistant U.S. Attorney (AUSA) Lesley Wolf ignored his allegation of “campaign finance criminal violations,” according to a copy of the memo released Sept. 27. (RELATED: IRS Whistleblower Was Removed From Hunter Biden Case After Rift With Top Prosecutor, IRS Officials Testify)

READ THE MEMO:

Gary Shapley Campaign Finance by James Lynch

“At this point in time, evidence obtained to date supports a prosecution recommendation for DOE [Hunter Biden] that he willfully evaded the assessment and payment of Federal income taxes due and owing,” Shapley wrote.

“This investigation has been hampered and slowed by claims of potential election meddling. Even after the election, the day of action was delayed more than two weeks. The FBI is a participating agency and they have provided conflicting opinions on investigative decisions. The FBI is actively investigating potential [redacted] violations. Through interviews and review of evidence obtained via [redacted] and search warrant, it appears there may be campaign finance criminal violations,” Shapley continued.

“AUSA Wolf stated on the last prosecution team meeting that she did not want any of the agents to look into the allegation,” Shapley added.

The IRS whistleblower testified to the House Ways and Means Committee in May and said Wolf did not want IRS agents to look into Shapley’s allegation.

“For example, as I wrote to my chain of command on a May 3rd, 2021, memo: ‘This investigation has been hampered and slowed by claims of potential election meddling.'” Shapley testified. “‘Through interviews and review of evidence obtained, it appears there may be campaign finance criminal violations. AUSA Wolf stated on the last prosecution team meeting that she did not want any of the agents to look into the allegation. She cited a need to focus on the 2014 tax year, that we could not yet prove an allegation beyond a reasonable doubt, and that she does not want to include their Public Integrity Unit because they would take authority away from her. We do not agree with her obstruction on this matter.'”

Shapley and IRS whistleblower Joseph Ziegler testified to House Ways and Means and accused DOJ investigators of giving Hunter Biden special treatment by slow-walking and actively obstructing the investigation. Shapley and Ziegler both highlighted Wolf for allegedly stonewalling search warrants and tipping off Hunter Biden’s defense counsel.

The House Ways and Means Committee also released an email Wolf sent to investigators instructing them to remove Joe Biden’s name from a search warrant and a text Hunter Biden allegedly sent to a business associate where he described the family “brand” as an asset.

Wolf’s name does not appear on any Delaware court document related to Hunter Biden’s failed guilty plea or his felony indictment on three counts related to firearms possession. (RELATED: Here Are The Biggest Takeaways From Merrick Garland’s Testimony About The Hunter Biden Case)

Shapley’s memo is part of a trove of documents released Wednesday by the House Ways and Means Committee substantiating the allegations by Shapley and Ziegler. The committee has also interviewed multiple IRS officials who have substantiated key aspects of the whistleblower testimony.

The House Ways and Means, Judiciary and Oversight Committees are leading the impeachment inquiry into Joe Biden pertaining to Hunter Biden’s foreign business dealings and the IRS whistleblower allegations. The first impeachment hearing is scheduled for Thursday, and three expert witnesses are expected to speak before the House Oversight Committee.