US

Trump Signs 9/11 First Responders Relief Bill

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Amber Athey White House Correspondent

President Donald Trump signed a bill Monday that provides relief to victims of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.

H.R.1327, or the “Never Forget the Heroes: James Zadroga, Ray Pfeifer, and Luis Alvarez Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act,” provides full funding for the 9/11 victim compensation fund through 2092. The compensation fund provides for medical care and losses experienced by victims and first responders stemming from the deadly attacks, and is estimated to cost over $10 billion over the next ten years. (RELATED: Senate Passes 9/11 Compensation Bill)

New York City first responders and guests look on as U.S. President Donald Trump signs the "Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act" during a signing ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2019. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

New York City first responders and guests look on as U.S. President Donald Trump signs the “Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” during a signing ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2019. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

The president signed the bipartisan legislation during a special event in the Rose Garden, featuring the families of the bill’s namesakes, including their children, widows, parents, and siblings.

“Today, we come together as one nation to support our Sept. 11 heroes,” Trump said. “They answered terror with the emotional strength of true American warriors.”

U.S. President Donald Trump pumps his fist during a signing ceremony for the "Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act" in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2019. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

U.S. President Donald Trump pumps his fist during a signing ceremony for the “Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2019. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Comedian Jon Stewart recently lobbied for the bill in Congress alongside first responders, ripping lawmakers for allegedly slow-walking the relief for victims. The first responders in question have experienced numerous health complications, including cancer, from inhaling the debris and toxic fumes from the fallen buildings during the attacks.

Luis Alvarez, a first responder who testified in front of Congress with Stewart, passed away in late June after a battle with colorectal cancer.

“You all said you would never forget. Well, I’m here to make sure that you don’t,” Alvarez told Congress last month.