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Economist Magazine Laments Poor People Living Longer Will Be Bad For The Environment

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Shelby Talcott Media Reporter
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The Economist magazine tweeted out a May article about global meat-eating being on the rise and noted an increase in poor people eating meat means the environment is going to suffer.

The article discussed the effects of global meat-eating and said the increase may be a result of struggling communities becoming wealthier.

“More poor people are eating meat around the world. That means they will live longer, healthier lives, but it is bad news for the environment,” The Economist said Tuesday on Twitter and re-upped the article.

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“Almost certainly, much forest will be cut down. Other consequences will be global,” according to the article. “Sub-Saharan Africans currently have tiny carbon footprints because they use so little energy — excluding South Africa, the entire continent produces about as much electricity as France.”

“The armies of cattle, goats and sheep will raise Africans’ collective contribution to global climate change, though not to near Western or Chinese levels,” it said. (RELATED: Rep. Ocasio-Cortez Instructs Americans To Eat Fewer Hamburgers)

The article, published May 4, was featured online and in The Economist’s print edition.

After explaining negative effects of global meat-eating, the article, titled “Global meat-eating is on the rise, bringing surprising benefits,” said it will result in poor people from third-world countries becoming healthier.

“People will probably become healthier, though,” the article reads. “Many African children are stunted (notably small for their age) partly because they do not get enough micronutrients such as Vitamin A. … Recent research in rural western Kenya found that children who regularly ate eggs grew 5% faster than children who did not; cow’s milk had a smaller effect.”

The Economist did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

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