Anti-Porn Group Blasts Teen Vogue Again For ‘Irresponsible’ Anal Sex Article 

Grace Carr | Reporter
  • Enough is Enough founder Donna Rice Hughes blasted Teen Vogue Wednesday for republishing an article telling teens how to have anal sex.
  • Hughes founded the group in 1994 after she gained notoriety in 1987 following an alleged affair with presidential hopeful Gary Hart.
  • Hughes maintains that Teen Vogue’s article is inappropriate and irresponsible and panders to the porn industry.

A group dedicated to internet safety blasted Teen Vogue again for republishing an article about how to have anal sex, calling the piece “inappropriate” and “irresponsible.”

Since 1994, Enough is Enough CEO Donna Rice Hughes has fought to make the internet safer, battling online and child pornography. The group launched a renewed campaign against Teen Vogue Wednesday.

“Parents trust us to let their kids read those magazines,” Hughes told The Daily Caller New Foundation by phone on Nov. 30. “Parents would be furious if they knew what their kids were reading.”

“It’s inappropriate and irresponsible of [Teen Vogue] to publish [the article],” Hughes added. 

Hughes first entered the public eye in 1987 when she allegedly had an affair with then-presidential candidate Gary Hart in what is largely considered the Bill Clinton-Monica Lewinsky scandal equivalent of the time. Hollywood released “The Front Runner” on Nov. 21, a movie chronicling the events of the 1988 Hart-Rice scandal.

Her group first called out Teen Vogue in 2017 after it published an article about how to have anal sex. Teen Vogue did not retract the article.

Teen Vogue published a revised version of the article, “Anal Sex: What You Need to Know,” in May. Enough is Enough calls for the magazine to remove the article from circulation and encourages those who object to the article to sign a petition.

“It’s important that we talk about all kinds of sex because not everyone is having, or wants to have, ‘penis in the vagina’ sex,” reads Teen Vogue’s updated article. “This is anal 101, for teens, beginners, and all inquisitive folk,” the piece continues.

The Twitter feature image of the article’s author, Gigi Engle, features Engle lying on a bed in skimpy dress holding a large vibrator on her lap. Engle is a contributor for Teen Vogue’s wellness section. She also contributes to Marie Claire, Elle Magazine, Glamour and Women’s Health.

She has posted numbers raunchy tweets.

“Teen Vogue has had the perception of being a wholesome brand on fashion and trends,” Hughes told TheDCNF. “It should not be a source on sexual experimentation.”

“The new normal is anal sex in pornography,” Hughes said and noted that Teen Vogue’s article promotes a warped view of sexual practice for young boys and girls. 

The magazine also refers to women as “vagina owners.”

The article “panders to the pornography industry’s exploitive and commercial aim,” Enough is Enough’s Dr. Jill Manning said in a Wednesday statement.

WATCH:

“We are not going to sit by idly while TeenVogue.com continues to encourage its young readers to engage in the ‘the highest risk sexual behavior for HIV transmission’ according the Center for Disease Control. Hands off our kids!” Hughes stated Wednesday.

In its first publication, Teen Vogue made no mention of using protection during anal sex to prevent HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, which it notes in a correction at the bottom of the piece.

“Condoms are also nonnegotiable. There is no risk of pregnancy during anal sex, but STIs are widespread and abundant. Protect yourself and practice safe sex every single time,” Teen Vogue warns in its updated article.

Sexual activity is a topic that should be discussed in the home, according to Hughes. The topic can be beneficial in a school setting depending on how it’s taught, Hughes told TheDCNF, adding that a health care provider is also a trusted source for questions about sex. (RELATED: Florida Man Jailed For Filing, Distributing Sexual Encounters With Multiple Other Dudes)

Hughes’ group has attacked other organizations over online pornography. Starbucks bent to pressure from Enough is Enough, announcing on Nov. 29 that it will block customers from using its Wi-Fi to watch hardcore porn.

Starbucks pledged to block illicit sites in 2016, but did not act on its promise until after Hughes issued a public statement on Nov. 26. Starting in 2019, Starbucks will prohibit store patrons from visiting Pornhub, RedTube, YouPorn, XVideos and other popular pornographic websites using a new filter tool, according to Business Insider.

The group also helped push forward H.R. 1865, which was signed into law by President Donald Trump in April to allow prosecutors and victims of pornography to pursue civil and criminal actions against websites that knowingly facilitate sex trafficking.

Neither Teen Vogue nor Engle responded to TheDCNF’s requests for comment.

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