US

California Hit By Magnitude 6.4 Earthquake. Expert Says An ‘Even Bigger’ One Could Hit In Days

Mario Tama/Getty Images

Daily Caller News Foundation logo
Font Size:

A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck Ridgecrest, California, on the Fourth of July, and the region could be in store for an even bigger quake in the coming days.

The earthquake was the strongest to hit the region since 1999, causing multiple injuries and two house fires, but was far enough away from the San Andreas fault that “any impact on the system will be minimal,” California Institute of Technology seismologist Lucy Jones told reporters, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Charred items sit in front of a home which caught fire following a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on July 4, 2019 in Ridgecrest, California. The earthquake was the largest to strike Southern California in 20 years with the epicenter located in a remote area of the Mojave Desert. The temblor was felt by residents across Southern California. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Charred items sit in front of a home which caught fire following a 6.4 magnitude earthquake on July 4, 2019 in Ridgecrest, California. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

“There is about a 1-in-20 chance that this location will be having an even bigger earthquake within the next few days — that we have not yet seen the biggest earthquake of the sequence,” Jones said. (RELATED: The Whole Earth Shook This November And Scientists Don’t Know Why)

WATCH:


A magnitude 5.4 earthquake struck the same region in Friday’s aftermath at 4:07 a.m. Pacific time, and a number of other aftershocks measuring magnitudes of 4.6, 4.2, 3.8 and 3.5  have been recorded in the same area. The tremors were felt in places as far as Sacramento, California; Reno, Nevada; Las Vegas; Phoenix; and Tijuana, Mexico, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

A 12-inch crack also appeared across Highway 178, according to the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

USGS seismologist Robert Graves said his agency is sending geologists to Searles Valley in an effort to determine whether the quake broke to the ground surface.

A damaged home is seen after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake hit in Ridgecrest, California, on July 4, 2019. - Southern California was rocked by a 6.4-magnitude earthquake Thursday morning, the US Geological Survey said, with authorities warning that the temblor, the largest in two decades, might not be the day's last. (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

A damaged home is seen after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake hit in Ridgecrest, California, on July 4, 2019. (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

“Sometimes 6.4s break all the way to the ground surface, and sometimes they don’t,” he said, according to the L.A. Times. “If it did break all the way up to the surface, we should see where two sides of the ground slid horizontally relative to each other. There may be some vertical displacement as well.”

Ridgecrest Mayor Peggy Breeden declared a state of emergency for the town Thursday, saying it will allow Ridgecrest to “seek services from all the entities, both state and federal, that can help us with the clean-up.” (RELATED: The First Videos Of The Alaskan Earthquake Are Horrifying)

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom also signed an emergency declaration Thursday for affected areas.

Workers repair damaged utility lines after a 6.4 magnitude earthquake struck the area on July 4, 2019 in Trona, California. The earthquake was the largest to strike Southern California in 20 years with the epicenter located in a remote area of the Mojave Desert. The temblor was felt by residents across much of Southern California. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Workers repair damaged utility lines after a 6.4 magnitude earthquake struck the area on July 4, 2019 in Trona, California. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump tweeted Thursday he was briefed on the earthquake and it seemed “to be very much under control.”

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.