Opinion

A choice to vote Republican

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R. Clarke Cooper
Executive Director, Log Cabin Republicans
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      R. Clarke Cooper

      R. Clarke Cooper is executive director of Log Cabin Republicans. He is an army veteran of the Iraq War and an eight-year Bush administration appointee.

The midterm election cycle presents many options for gays and lesbians all across the country, whether to pull the lever for a party that claims to stand for equality while defending ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ in court, a party which chooses sweeping healthcare mandates over achieving tax equity for domestic partners, and a party which failed to even bring up employment non-discrimination for a vote — or voters can choose a party that stands for lower taxes, a stronger national defense, and fiscal policies that will stimulate small business and put Americans back to work.

This is a strange dynamic for many gays and lesbians, as 2008 was supposed to send a ‘fierce advocate’ to the White House, end ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,’ and rapidly pass legislation ensuring equal protection under the law. Instead, what voters got was a Democratic National Committee chairman who directed Maine voters to help out with elections in New Jersey, rather than oppose a ballot referendum on marriage equality; a White House senior advisor who labeled being gay as a ‘lifestyle choice,’ and an administration that believes ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ is constitutional and worth zealously defending in court.

Considering this sub-par record of Democratic achievement, it is time for gay and lesbian Americans to reexamine why they vote so often for candidates who fail to deliver solutions to the issues challenging their community. As is the case for so many Americans right now, gays and lesbians should be looking for candidates supporting a legislative agenda focused on creating jobs, lowering taxes, halting runaway government spending, and reducing an incomprehensible national debt. After four years of liberal majorities in Congress which they have used to vastly increase government’s role in the market and impose new burdens and uncertainty on America’s business owners, expecting Democrats to do an about-face and encourage any kind of economic opportunity is an exercise in futility. Whatever your sexual orientation, this economy hurts us all. It is time for a change.

There are three compelling reasons for gays and lesbians across the country to vote Republican this year:

– Our money should be ours to spend. Money earned by gays and lesbians is no more the government’s money than anyone else’s, and it should not be doled out to obscure government programs and given as kickbacks to special interests who backed the President and his allies in the last election. We certainly do not need to be propping up public sector unions suckling at the taxpayer teat. If we are mature enough to choose our representation, we can certainly decide what to do with our own money.

– Creativity drives entrepreneurship. Small business owners are America’s job creators, and gay and lesbian employers are some of the most ingenious among them. Voting Republican will help ensure a business climate that encourages, rather than discourages, job growth. Gay and lesbian small business owners today are faced with mountains of needless regulations, forcing them to focus more on paperwork and avoiding administrative tripwires and less on creating stronger, more prosperous communities. That reality will not change with two years of tax-and-spend Democrats in Congress who simply don’t understand what it takes for businesses to succeed.

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  • Liberty Issues

    I’m amazed how many voters — across the political spectrum– don’t know that Barry Goldwater was a stronger supporter of gays in the military than President Obama. Paraphrasing from memory, “The only straight you need is the ability to shoot straight.”

    This was part of Goldwater’s ongoing war against SOME on the Christian Right who would impose a theocracy in America. The same folks who claim Thomas Jefferson had no idea what the First Amendment means. Goldwater’s other famous line was that all good Christians should give Jerry Falwell a swift kick in the ass.

    Goldwater was providing cover for his friend, Ronald Reagan, who totally ignored the religious right LEADERSHIP, and was only sympathetic to its rank and file.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dustyn-Hughes/692357656 Dustyn Hughes

    I’m afraid that carrefour is being a little disingenuous as well in his comment above. At least as far as attacking Mr. Cooper’s concern about Gay Rights.

    If you look at his bio, you’ll see that he is Director of the Log Cabin Republicans. The LCR were the ones who successfully sued the government to stop DADT in San Diego earlier this year. Which is why he goes after Obama for ,correctly IMO, getting an injunction on the judges order to stop DADT.

    That should make it pretty obvious that he is doing what he can for Gay rights.

    Personally I do not agree with Mr. Cooper re: Gay Marriage…but that doesn’t mean I want to see his character maligned by incorrect information.

  • carrefour

    Mr. Cooper is being more than a bit disingenuous. Will a GOP-led Congress take up DADT repeal? No. Speaker Pelosi’s House has already passed it, but the GOP is blocking it in the Senate.

    Will a Speaker Boehner try to outlaw employment discrimination based on sexual orientation? Not a chance. They won’t even pay lip service, because they think it SHOULD be legal to fire gay people.

    It would be more honest of Mr. Cooper to say simply, “Gay Republicans don’t care about gay rights, so it doesn’t matter to us if a party hostile to them takes over government.”

    He can’t say that out loud of course, because it’s kind of idiotic.

    If the gay right spent more time pressuring their party to dump the conservative pretenders and religious bullies and less time pointing to Democratic failures on gay issues that are largely the fault of Republican road blocks, then they’d have some legitimacy. As it is, they are not part of the solution. They’re fine with second-class status. The rest of us are not.