Politics

Republicans scramble to avoid another New York special election loss

Photo of Steven Nelson
Steven Nelson
Associate Editor

Republicans in New York may again face defeat in a safe district filled by a special election. The 26th District, formerly represented by “Craigslist Congressman” Christopher Lee, will be electing a new congressman later this month.

Three candidates have substantial support in polling. Republican Jane Corwin, Democrat Kathleen Hochul and Jack Davis, who is running as a Tea Party candidate.

In a late April Siena poll, Corwin led with 36 percent of the vote to Hochul’s 31 percent. Davis, however, was supported by a significant 23 percent of respondents.

Republicans say that the Tea Party candidate is nothing more than a Democratic plant, chosen as a spoiler to confuse voters.

Corwin released an ad Thursday, calling voters’ attention to Davis’s past as a Democratic candidate for Congress. Corwin says that this puts her competitor in league with opponents of commonly accepted “Tea Party” ideals.

“Davis was a hand-picked candidate of Nancy Pelosi, and said he was proud to help her become speaker,” says the ad. “Davis took thousands of dollars from Barack Obama, and even endorsed his campaign for president.”

Davis ran in the district as a Democrat in 2004 and 2006. “Democrat Jack Davis, he just can’t be trusted,” says the ad.

In an ad of his own, Davis attacks both major parties for supporting free trade agreements, Wall Street bailouts, and corporate tax breaks.

“Now, to make us pay for it all, Republican Jane Corwin wants to replace Medicare with vouchers and Democrat Kathy Hochul wants to raise taxes again,” says Davis’ ad, promising that “independent Jack Davis will be a congressman for the rest of us, opposing trade deals, fighting for our jobs.”

Also running in the district is Buffalo Beast editor Ian Murphy, as a Green Party candidate. Murphy attracted national attention for impersonating David Koch on a call with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, but only polled at 1 percent support in the Sienna poll.

New York Democratic Sen. Kristen Gillibrand came out swinging for Hochul this week. In a fundraising letter to EMILY’s list supporters, Gillibrand said, “With Kathy on the ballot, Democrats have a real shot at cutting into the Republican House majority this year.”

Other national Democrats have kept Hochul at an arms length compared with the embrace that Corwin has received ahead of the May 24 election.

An internal Hochul campaign poll, reported by Politico Friday, shows an extremely close race with 31 percent support for Corwin, 30 percent for Hochul, and 26 percent for Davis.

The special election in poised to be a repeat of the 2009 special election in New York’s 23rd district, when the Republican vote was divided between liberal Republican Dede Scozzafava and Conservative Party candidate Doug Hoffman, allowing for Democrat Bill Owens to win in the traditionally Republican district.

Jane Corwin ad attacking “Democrat Jack Davis”

Jack Davis ad attacking Corwin and Hochul:

  • bozsbusiness

    If this kind of thing is widespread in 2012, the progressives will take back the House and Obama will win in a walk!!!!
    It will be deja Perot all over again.

  • Pingback: The Tea Party Needs To Gain Control Of Some of Its So-Called Candidates!… All Too Often Obvious Plants, With A Questionable Political Past Come Forward!…

  • lollytyg

    We need to have a method to identify true tea party candidates, and to invalidate phonies.
    A trademarked icon that can only be assigned by a national committee? Maybe?

    • thephranc

      The problem with that is you get away from a grass roots coalition and become a party. Some would say that will destroy the Republican chances to beat the dams. I say that isn’t such a bad thing.

      But what is the litmus test to be a TEA party member? Like the R and D parties thay are private membership groups who have the final say over who can and can’t represent the parties. If Scozzafava in any indication you can have a very not TEA party member still tagged as a TEA party. And what will the platform be? A social one or a fiscal one? The last thing I want is for the religious right injecting their brand of insanity into what should be logical and secular as our government is secular.

  • Mr.ManZ

    Im have to agree with ChickFight on this one, The Tea Party support here seems to be way off base, and is overdue for a self check. Davis past seems to paint a clear picture of a liberal leaner. This could really spell bad news for the republican party and due to such poor tea party pics lost more bad news for 2012.

  • jfhdsiu

    The Republicans are claiming the Tea Party movement is part of the Democrat party and the Democrat party claims the Tea Party movement is part of the Republican party. Neither major party can admit that the Tea Party stands on it’s own….ALONE…. The Democrats and Republicans are really so closely aligned on most stuff that their only argument is ‘who’s’ going to do it to us, not what! But when it comes to the Tea Party movement they’re totally bi-partisan……They hate the Tea Party movement. I would like to see the tea party guy win.