Politics
Federal Security Director Joseph S. Salter, left, of the Transportation Security Administration, has his credentials examined by TSA officer Christopher Sweet at T.F. Green Airport, Tuesday, June 14, 2011, in Warwick, R.I. Salter, the state Federal Security Director Joseph S. Salter, left, of the Transportation Security Administration, has his credentials examined by TSA officer Christopher Sweet at T.F. Green Airport, Tuesday, June 14, 2011, in Warwick, R.I. Salter, the state's first airport federal security director is stepping down nearly a decade after the Sept. 11, 2011, terrorist attacks brought him out of retirement. He was among the original TSA federal security directors hired. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)  

Two House members call for investigation of TSA

Two Republican House members are calling for an investigation of the Transportation Security Administration after serious lapses in security led to the firing of dozens TSA employees at Honolulu International Airport.

Rep. John Mica of Florida and Rep. Jason Chaffetz of Utah, both harsh critics of TSA, wrote to the Department of Homeland Security Acting Inspector General today and requested an investigation of TSA security failures, including a detailed summary of the security breakdown and corrective action taken.

This month, TSA delivered letters of “proposed termination” to 36 workers at Honolulu International Airport, including five members of its leadership team, and suspended 12 more after an internal investigation revealed that carry-on bags were allegedly entering airplanes without being screened.

“Unfortunately the incident at Honolulu Airport is just another example of what can happen when the nation’s transportation security agency acts as both the operator and regulator of aviation screening,” Mica said in a press statement. “It is essential that we have a full investigation of this massive TSA lapse and ensure the nation has the most effective security system possible.”

Mica is chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, which released a report earlier this month slamming TSA for halting a program that allowed airports to use privately contracted screeners.

“I have long expressed my serious misgivings about the TSA’s approach to securing an airplane,” Chaffetz added in the release. “This most recent incident in Hawaii only magnifies my concerns and highlights the failures of the TSA. There is a more effective and efficient way to handle aviation screening. I hope and expect this investigation will be the catalyst for change.”