Politics

The government’s war on cameras

Jerome Vorus was taking pictures of the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. last July when he decided to snap some photographs of a routine traffic stop.

Little did he know he would soon find himself detained by police for photographing them without permission. Of course, Vorus was well within his rights, but he still had to wait an hour and a half before the officers released him. (TSA employee caught stuffing passengers’ junk in his trunks)

Vorus filed a lawsuit last week against the District of Columbia and the four police officers involved in his detainment, claiming his Fourth and First Amendment rights were violated. He is being represented in his case by the American Civil Liberties Union.

There have been numerous cases like Vorus’ recently, where citizens are being detained, arrested or intimidated for documenting police activity or even just taking photos of government buildings.

“This is happening more and more,” Vorus said in a phone interview. “Police are arresting journalists, photographers and tourists, often using excuses like terrorism or security.”

Here’s a few more notable examples:

  • On June 2, Miami police seized a man’s cell phone at gunpoint and smashed it after the man recorded an officer-involved shooting.
  • A Rochester, New York woman was arrested in June for videotaping police from her front yard. She was charged with obstructing justice.
  • In January, two Illinois residents were charged with eavesdropping — a class I felony — after they recorded their encounters with Chicago police. One of the citizens, a woman, was recording her interview with two internal affairs investigators. She was filing a sexual harassment complaint against another Chicago police officer.
  • A motorcyclist in Maryland was also charged with eavesdropping in April after he uploaded a video to YouTube — caught on his helmet cam — of a state trooper stopping him with a drawn gun. Police showed up at his house four days after the traffic stop with a warrant for four computers, two laptops and his camera.

The spike in arrests for photography has mirrored the rise of cell phone cameras and YouTube, which has made it easy for citizens to act as journalists and spread their videos to thousands, sometimes millions, of viewers on the Internet.

“Suddenly people who didn’t normally have cameras did,” said Carlos Miller, a Miami-based journalist, photographer and blogger. “And they were taking pictures. We then saw a huge increase in cops telling people they couldn’t do that.”

Miller was arrested twice for photographing the police, once in 2007 and once in 2009. After his first arrest, Miller started a blog, Photography is Not a Crime, to document what happened. Since then, the blog has expanded to cover similar cases across the country.

Part of the problem is police were not used to being documented and not up to speed on the laws surrounding public photography.

“This is really a brand new subject,” said Rich Roberts, the public information officer for the International Union of Police Associations.

Roberts said police in these situations worry about biased editing or being targeted for retaliation. Even complete videos are subject to interpretation, often by people who don’t understand police procedure. Citizens can also cause a distraction or create a safety risk, even if they’re not actively interfering with the police, Roberts said.

“If I’m doing a potentially dangerous traffic stop, and a guy comes into my peripheral vision pointing something at me, then I’m going to be distracted,” Roberts said. “That can lead to a nasty situation.”

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7KCMNUD3RT6LFMGFUCDMD6G6U4 William Wallace

    Kill the fascist cops!

  • Pingback: Arrest Photographer | Government Buildings | Police Intimidation | The Daily Caller | G11 Photography Magazine

  • Pingback: fyi...WI signs CCW into law

  • DANIEL CABRERA

    Of pictures and words;…

    http://lmaobama.com/2011/04/18/3402/

    Daniel Cabrera
    Merrillville,Indiana

  • MyChalkLine

    “Police officers also have no reasonable expectation to privacy while in public and performing a public service.”

    The story really should end there.

    As a private citizen i am legally filmed and photographed everywhere in public i go by the government and privately owned cameras, in fact most police cars have dash cams.

    What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

    The fed, state, and local governments responsible for these arrests should be sued for as much as it takes to stop the harassment of citizens by police who’d otherwise not be held accountable.

    And the Niagara Transit Authority officer who told a person videotaping him that “if you take my picture again, I’m gonna break your f#$%ing face.” should be arrested for his threats and fired, keeping officers like this is what makes the public lose confidence in the police

  • MyChalkLine

    “Police officers also have no reasonable expectation to privacy while in public and performing a public service.”

    The story really should end there.

    As a private citizen i am legally filmed and photographed everywhere in public i go by the government and privately owned cameras, in fact most police cars have dash cams.

    What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

    The fed, state, and local governments responsible for these arrests should be sued for as much as it takes to stop the harassment of citizens by police who’d otherwise not be held accountable.

    And the Niagara Transit Authority officer who told a person videotaping him that “if you take my picture again, I’m gonna break your fucking face.” should be arrested for his threats and fired, keeping officers like this is what makes the public lose confidence in the police.

    • MyChalkLine

      “Your comment is awaiting moderation.?”

      Why because i quoted the exact language found in the article you’ve posted?

      if it violates the community standards here why did your editor let it slip through?