Opinion

Why we can’t do big things anymore

Photo of David Holt
David Holt
President, Consumer Energy Alliance
  • See All Articles
  • Subscribe to RSS
  • Bio

      David Holt

      David Holt is president of the non-profit organization, Consumer Energy Alliance. Consumer Energy Alliance was formed to help support the thoughtful utilization of all domestic energy resources to improve domestic energy security and reduce consumer prices. The mission of Consumer Energy Alliance is to improve consumer understanding of our nation's energy security, including the need to reduce reliance on imported oil and natural gas, maintain reasonable energy prices for consumers, and continue efforts to diversify our energy resources.

      As part of its efforts to build dialogue between consumers and the energy sector, Consumer Energy Alliance played a key role in the recent Mineral Management Service’s (MMS) Five Year Plan for the Outer Continental Shelf. Working with an expansive coalition of energy and consumer groups, CEA helped deliver tens of thousands of public comments in support of thoughtful offshore oil & gas development – including the areas offshore Alaska and Virginia.

      Consumer Energy Alliance now has more than 115 consumer and energy groups as part of its Alliance. Through its various activities, CEA works to continue to expand dialogue and develop joint messaging among the energy and consuming sectors.

At a recent campaign event, President Obama said that the United States “became an economic superpower because we knew how to build things.” He went on to list the Hoover Dam and the Golden Gate Bridge as monuments to America’s capacity for greatness.

Yet somewhere along the line, the ability to complete massive public works projects ended. “When did that happen?” the president asked.

It’s impossible to pinpoint exactly when it happened, but we all know why it happened, and it has nothing to do with our capacity for innovation. The culprit is a labyrinth of increasingly complex and confusing federal regulations.

Take, for example, the Gulf of Mexico. Deepwater drilling was considered virtually impossible in the early 1900s, but technological advances and the human spirit of innovation made it a reality. Today the Gulf of Mexico is the largest single source of domestic petroleum in the United States.

Yet despite this operational display of greatness, the administration’s response to the first significant offshore incident in the Gulf in almost 60 years (and more than 55,000 wells drilled) was to shut it down by banning deepwater drilling. Government and industry needed to take a step back to assess the situation and fully ensure safety and environmental protection. But since May 2010, there has been a 37 percent decrease in operating rigs in the Gulf, 11 of which have left for other countries, costing more than 11,000 people their jobs — even though the ban officially ended over a year ago. The Energy Information Administration now projects that the Gulf will produce 360,000 fewer barrels of oil per day than what it was projected to produce prior to the moratorium.

Companies drilling off the Alaska coast are trying to navigate the federal government’s new, ever-changing rules so they can responsibly develop the massive oil resources in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, which could hold more oil than the Gulf of Mexico and would generate more than 50,000 new jobs. Yet the Environmental Protection Agency has consistently withheld permits for companies like Shell to operate there. Shell has had to spend almost $5 billion just to keep its plans on hold.

The Keystone XL pipeline would create thousands of new construction and manufacturing jobs in the middle of the country, significantly reduce our dependence on Middle Eastern oil and generate billions of dollars in new tax revenue. Environmental analyses show that it will be the safest pipeline ever constructed, a significant accomplishment in a country with over 160,000 miles of pipelines transporting oil products.

Yet Keystone XL has remained stalled for three years, with federal bureaucrats constantly thinking twice and requiring new and redundant analyses that always generate the same conclusions.

And now the EPA is signaling that it wants to clamp down on the domestic natural gas industry, which is in the midst of a technological revolution that is making it possible for massive amounts of natural gas to be extracted from shale. That will have spillover effects on natural gas-dependent sectors like the chemical and steel industries — unless the EPA has its way and stops American ingenuity in its tracks.