The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
              In this Jan. 31, 2011 photo, Bank of America customers use ATM machines in New York. The third quarter earnings that banks have reported, Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011, show that they are struggling to make money the old fashioned way, by lending to consumers and businesses, when interest rates are at historic lows. New rules have stunted the banks  In this Jan. 31, 2011 photo, Bank of America customers use ATM machines in New York. The third quarter earnings that banks have reported, Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011, show that they are struggling to make money the old fashioned way, by lending to consumers and businesses, when interest rates are at historic lows. New rules have stunted the banks' ability to collect certain kinds of fees like checking account overdrafts and late credit card payments, so they're making up for it with new charges like Bank of America's $5 monthly fee for using debit cards, which ignited a public firestorm that reached all the way to the White House. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)   

Bank Of America Just Had The Ultimate Social Media Fail

This makes you wonder if Bank of America, which is currently axing 30,000 of its staff globally, already cut their social media team.

Or if they don’t already have a social media team, they should really consider getting one after this social media fail.

It’s been just a week since Google Plus started allowing for companies to have pages on the social networking site and it looks like someone already beat Bank of America to the punch, according to Carl Franzen at Talking Points Memo.

BofA’s Google Plus profile bashes the already embattled Charlotte, North Carolina-based bank. The page, which is no longer available, features unflattering pictures of former CEO Ken Lewis and mocking wall posts.

One wall post said, “Living under a tarp? I am too. My TARP is much bigger, however, and billions of dollars more expensive.”

It’s possible that the page could have been created by the bank initially and then later hacked.

However, according to Chester Wisniewski at the IT security blog NakedSecurity, the page was likely created by a group that tricked Google into thinking they were Bank of America.

We’ve included a screen shot below. [via TalkingPointsMemo]

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