Politics
Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in the arms trafficking investigation called Operation Fast and Furious. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in the arms trafficking investigation called Operation Fast and Furious. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  

No-confidence motion against Holder to be introduced in House on Thursday

Photo of Matthew Boyle
Matthew Boyle
Investigative Reporter

Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gosar, one of the first congressmen who demanded that Attorney General Eric Holder resign immediately, told The Daily Caller he’s introducing an official House resolution to push for a vote of no confidence in Holder as attorney general.

The House resolution is a way to formalize the growing surge in calls for Holder’s immediate resignation, and it sends a message to House leadership and to the administration that many members of Congress aren’t happy with Holder’s behavior throughout the congressional investigation into Operation Fast and Furious.

Gosar told TheDC he has two goals with this resolution. “First, the reproval by Congress of an executive official, is a significant statement,” Gosar said in an email. “Cabinet positions, including the Attorney General, are appointed with the consent of half of Congress, the Senate.”

“There is clearly a role for Congress in evaluating executive branch officials,” he continued. “When an executive branch official fails to act in the best interests of the country, acts illegally, or fails to uphold the faith and integrity the duties of the office demand, Congress is more than entitled to express its approbation, disapproval or censure. This resolution does that for the House.”

The second goal, Gosar said, is to raise “public awareness” of what happened during Fast and Furious. TheDC reported on Wednesday that at least two Democratic members of Congress — both members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus — weren’t aware of Fast and Furious until they were approached about the scandal.

“By filing this resolution, we are anticipating a debate on the House floor and a floor vote,” Gosar said. “This will bring needed inquiry, exposure and transparency to the issue itself.” (RELATED: Full coverage of Operation Fast and Furious)

The measure is largely symbolic but is nonetheless a more official move than statements from members calling for Holder’s resignation. It includes a breakdown of everything those in favor of the no confidence resolution allege Holder to have done to earn it. A floor vote isn’t likely to happen any time soon, unless House Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor, or  another member of leadership gets on board quickly.

Gosar said he hasn’t discussed the measure with leadership yet.

The resolution alleges that Holder’s actions have proven the nation’s “top law enforcement official” is not “competent, trustworthy and beyond reproach” and that he has sought to “cover up” mistakes when they are made rather than cooperating with Congress “in disclosing the events and circumstances and transparently addressing the issues.”

The measure describes how Holder “presided over a law enforcement scheme called ‘Operation Fast and Furious’ that was ill conceived at the outset and mismanaged.”

It describes Fast and Furious as an operation that “allowed thousands of weapons of various types to be illegally sold and or transferred from the United States to violent drug cartels and known criminals in Mexico and elsewhere” and that the operation “was not set up to catch criminals and no proper monitoring of the guns being sold or transferred was undertaken.”