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WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09: Elizabeth Warren speaks during the AARP Magazine WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09: Elizabeth Warren speaks during the AARP Magazine's 2011 Inspire Awards at Ronald Reagan Building on December 9, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Kris Connor/Getty Images)  

UPenn also called Elizabeth Warren a minority in diversity report

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Will Rahn
Senior Editor

Harvard University may not be the only school that thought Massachusetts Democratic Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren was a Native American.

In 1994, one year before she joined the faculty at Harvard, Warren won the prestigious Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania, where she was teaching at the time. Eleven years later, the Minority Equity Committee of the University of Pennsylvania published a report that listed every winner of the award since 1991 and highlighted the names of minority recipients — including Elizabeth Warren’s.

A spokesperson for Warren’s campaign did not immediately return The Daily Caller’s request for comment on whether Warren knew the University of Pennsylvania considered her to be a minority when she taught there.

The news first broke in late April that the blond-haired, blue-eyed Warren had been listed as a Native American in professional law school directories in the 1980s and ’90s, and was once described by Harvard as a Native American.

Warren has claimed she does not know how Harvard came to believe that — while still insisting that, according to “family lore,” she does have Cherokee blood.

The Senate hopeful has also insisted that she has no recollection of discussing her Native American heritage with Harvard, and denies she ever used it to promote her career.

Her campaign has so far refused to release her job applications and law school records despite repeated calls by her Republican opponent, Sen. Scott Brown, to do so. (RELATED: Republicans want Harvard to investigate Warren’s ‘academic fraud’)

The Lindback Award, which comes with a $3,000 prize, is said by the University of Pennsylvania to “have a symbolic importance that transcends the recognition of individual merit.” According to the award’s published criteria, it “should be used to advance effective teaching by serving as reminders to as wide a spectrum of the University community as possible.”

See the document:

UPenn 2005 Minority Equity Report

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