The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

Romney is right about the importance of being able to fire people

Photo of Ann Coulter
Ann Coulter
Political Commentator

Last week, President Obama said “the private sector is doing fine.” This was not reassuring to those of us who suspect the Democrats haven’t the first idea what “private sector” means.

He did not help matters by becoming lachrymose over the suffering of public sector employees: “Where we’re seeing weaknesses in our economy have to do with state and local government. … And so, if Republicans want to be helpful, if they really want to move forward and put people back to work, what they should be thinking about is, how do we help state and local governments …”

When Democrats say the public sector is suffering, they mean public sector employees have half the unemployment rate of the rest of the country — 4.2 percent compared to 8.2 percent.

Obama’s monumentally idiotic statement has led his media defenders to recycle Mitt Romney’s alleged “gaffe” from several months ago, when he said: “I like being able to fire people who provide services to me.”

But that was not a gaffe at all — except as deceptively edited by the media to end after the word “people.” (Only Donald Trump enjoys firing people, and by the way, people love watching Donald Trump fire people.)

Far from a gaffe, Romney’s actual sentence is the key to understanding the nation’s health care crisis — which happens to be exactly what he was talking about.

Nearly every product you can think of has gotten better and cheaper in the last 20 years because of market competition: cell phones, television sets, computers, food delivery, airline tickets (constrained by the cost of fuel), express mail, and on and on.

There aren’t a lot of restaurants serving lousy food or dog walkers who lose your dog because they’d go out of business pretty fast if they provided rotten services. They’re not the only game in town.

But you know what is the only game in town? The government, including putatively private businesses that are heavily regulated by the government. Only with the government do we continuously get worse service for a higher price.

Take away the ability to fire people, and you have airport security, public schools, Veterans Administration hospitals, the Postal Service, General Motors and Pinch Sulzberger, New York Times family scion.

Health insurers may technically be private companies, but they are required by law to cover a slew of services, making them an extension of monopolistic government. (Similarly, the old AT&T was a “private” company, but in reality it was just a government-run monopolistic phone company providing no choice, poor service, little innovation and obscenely high prices.)

In most states, you can’t choose a health insurance plan that doesn’t cover gambling and sex addictions, psychological counseling, speech therapy and prenatal care — even if you plan on never having children.

Health insurance companies don’t need to compete for your business — they’re all offering the same product, anyway. Moreover, because of government regulation concerning how health insurance is taxed, most people aren’t choosing their insurers. Their employers are.

As a result, insurance companies have become outrageously unresponsive to both patients and doctors. Insurance companies need only concern themselves with satisfying government regulators and corporate purchasers. Meanwhile, doctors have to please only the insurance companies, which don’t particularly care how patients are treated, as long as it’s cheap.

This is a third-party-payer problem, or as the proverb goes, “He who pays the piper calls the tune.” All third-party-payer systems are disasters. The customer is trapped, forced to pay for something he doesn’t want, with no one to complain to and no possibility of taking his business elsewhere.