The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
FILE- This July 18, 2010 file photo shows Alvin Greene,  the then Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, waving after making his first public speech during the monthly meeting of the NAACP at Manning Junior High School, in Manning, S.C. (AP Photo/Mary Ann Chastain,File) FILE- This July 18, 2010 file photo shows Alvin Greene, the then Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, waving after making his first public speech during the monthly meeting of the NAACP at Manning Junior High School, in Manning, S.C. (AP Photo/Mary Ann Chastain,File)  

Reporters release another Alvin Greene comic book. Seriously.

Get ready for an Alvin Greene comic book. Another one.

Greene, the unlikely and entirely bizarre Democratic challenger to Republican Sen. Jim DeMint in South Carolina in 2010, released a superhero themed comic book after his failed Senate bid. In the comic book, Greene’s embarrassing past was apparently whitewashed to portray him as a modern day mix of Robin Hood and Superman. Now, two reporters are out with a new comic book that tells the real Alvin Greene story, warts and all.

Actually, Columbia Free Times reporter Corey Hutchins and freelance reporter David Axe prefer to call “The Accidental Candidate: The Rise and Fall of Alvin Greene” a graphic novel, which Hutchins says just sounds “so much more grown up and literary.” And this is certainly no hagiography like the last Greene comic book. Did you ever want to see the story of Alvin Greene showing pornography to a college student depicted graphically in cartoonish form? If so, you’re in luck. With the help of illustrator Blue Delliquanti, the scene appears all its glory in Hutchins and Axe’s masterpiece.

You may be asking yourself, why would anyone spend so much time and effort producing an Alvin Greene comic book? Hutchins, South Carolina Press Association’s journalist of the year, told The Daily Caller Greene’s tale simply demanded it.

“I grew up watching the X-Files and related to Mulder more than Scully. Life is more interesting when there’s a conspiracy behind everything. The Alvin Greene story was set up just for that,” he said.

“Did the Republicans and Jim DeMint’s C-Street gang put this guy up to run and then leak his federal obscenity charge to the press after he won? Were the voting machines hacked by an underworld Blackwater-type crack team of professional election riggers? Where did an unemployed Army vet get $10,000 to blow on a crapshoot primary? Who was the mysterious woman who came out of nowhere to live with and ‘advise’ Alvin, but ended up becoming a PR nightmare for him? Why did one of Alvin’s elderly rural neighbors pull me aside behind his truck one day and hiss in my ear that ‘Something ain’t right’? Those were all valid questions and led down any rabbit hole you chose to dive in. The book places them in context with what really happened.”

See TheDC’s full interview with Hutchins about his comic book, where Greene is today and whether we may see Greene run for president sometime soon:

So, a comic book on Alvin Greene? Seriously? 

I prefer to call it a graphic novel. It just sounds so much more grown up and literary, doesn’t it? But seriously, even two years after the Alvin Greene saga turned South Carolina into another national punchline, people were asking whether this stranger-than-fiction story was a comedy or a tragedy. Maybe we helped answer that with the publishing format?
What are the most interesting things you discovered researching the book? 
I grew up watching the X-Files and related to Mulder more than Scully. Life is more interesting when there’s a conspiracy behind everything. The Alvin Greene story was set up just for that. Did the Republicans and Jim DeMint’s C-Street gang put this guy up to run and then leak his federal obscenity charge to the press after he won? Were the voting machines hacked by an underworld Blackwater-type crack team of professional election riggers? Where did an unemployed Army vet get $10,000 to blow on a crapshoot primary? Who was the mysterious woman who came out of nowhere to live with and “advise” Alvin, but ended up becoming a PR nightmare for him? Why did one of Alvin’s elderly rural neighbors pull me aside behind his truck one day and hiss in my ear that “Something ain’t right?” Those were all valid questions and led down any rabbit hole you chose to dive in. The book places them in context with what really happened.