The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Citizens vote on electronic machines during the final day of early voting at the Lancaster Board of Elections November 5, 2012 in Lancaster, Ohio.  Ohio, a battleground state which no Republican has won the US Presidency without its electoral votes, is closely contested between US President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI        (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images) Citizens vote on electronic machines during the final day of early voting at the Lancaster Board of Elections November 5, 2012 in Lancaster, Ohio. Ohio, a battleground state which no Republican has won the US Presidency without its electoral votes, is closely contested between US President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)  

Ohio recount plan could take election into overtime

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CINCINNATI — Election Day could launch election month in Ohio, a weeks-long period in which deadlines for counting provisional or absentee votes and, if necessary, for a recount could delay the outcome of the presidential race until early December.

If there is a recount of the presidential race — triggered by the victorious candidate winning by less than one-fourth of 1 percent of the total Ohio vote — state officials would have to shorten some timetables specified in state law to meet the deadline.

Under Ohio election codes, Secretary of State Jon Husted has until Dec. 7 to certify the statewide results. Five days later, a recount could begin Dec. 12. Both dates, however, could be moved up — and would have to be if a particularly close race mandates a recount.

In the 2008 presidential election, nearly 5.8 million Ohioans voted. Assuming the turnout is 6 million this year, which is nearly 52 percent of Ohio’s population, a recount would be required if the winning margin is less than 15,000 votes — a figure bigger than the winning edge in 1976, when Democrat Jimmy Carter defeated President Gerald Ford by only 11,116 votes out of nearly 4.1 million cast.

Full story: Ohio recount plan could take election into overtime