Education
Book burning. Photo - United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Book burning. Photo - United States Holocaust Memorial Museum  

OPINION: Free speech is dead on American campuses

The Wall Street Journal
Contributor

At Yale University, you can be prevented from putting an F. Scott Fitzgerald quote on your T-shirt. At Tufts, you can be censured for quoting certain passages from the Quran. Welcome to the most authoritarian institution in America: the modern university — “a bizarre, parallel dimension,” as Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, calls it.

Mr. Lukianoff, a 38-year-old Stanford Law grad, has spent the past decade fighting free-speech battles on college campuses. The latest was last week at Fordham University, where President Joseph McShane scolded College Republicans for the sin of inviting Ann Coulter to speak.

“To say that I am disappointed with the judgment and maturity of the College Republicans . . . would be a tremendous understatement,” Mr. McShane said in a Nov. 9 statement condemning the club’s invitation to the caustic conservative pundit. He vowed to “hold out great contempt for anyone who would intentionally inflict pain on another human being because of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or creed.”

Full story: How Free Speech Died on Campus