Education
Karl Marx. Photo - public domain Karl Marx. Photo - public domain  

OPINION: Outlandish college courses: the public-school Dirty Dozen

The public undergraduate institution in the United States: the alma mater the majority of American college grads and a sacred trust (even if classes are typically large and red tape is often stifling).

It’s one thing for students at places like Harvard University and Duke University to enroll in frivolous courses, even at a time when college costs and youth unemployment are alarmingly high.

It’s quite another thing altogether when blatant liberal bias appears — constantly — in classrooms at taxpayer-subsidized universities.

And it’s another thing still when the other side simply isn’t presented. The anti-capitalist, race-based, orthodox feminist and global warming-themed courses found at virtually every prestigious public university would be far less disturbing if they were offset by a discussion of conservative ideals. Professors consistently ignore the likes of F.A. Hayek and Milton Friedman. Instead, students are routinely left to study John Maynard Keynes and assigned readings by Karl Marx. Where are the classes that give an honest portrayal of Ronald Reagan as one of the most valued presidents of the post-World War II era? Where are the classes that propose an honest discussion of conservatism?

The tradition of The Dirty Dozen began in 1995. Since then, Young America’s Foundation has publicized courses at public universities such as “How to be Gay” (University of Michigan) and — apparently a perennial favorite all over — “Black Marxism” (University of California, Santa Barbara).

These courses and countless others like them do little to prepare young people for the job market in a complex Western economy. They offer little real-world value at all outside of the academic bubble of the college campus.

Today, The Daily Caller concludes its presentation of Young America’s Foundation’s The Dirty Dozen — this time for elite public schools. The schools offering these courses are all ranked in the top 50 by U.S. News & World Report.

Course descriptions are reprinted verbatim from the schools’ websites.

University of Wisconsin–Madison, Gender and Women’s Studies: Lesbian Culture

Exploration of lesbian culture and history. Focuses on the history, meanings, and representations of relationships among women; critically analyzes the concepts of lesbian perspective, theory, aesthetic, and sensibility.

University of Texas at Austin, Anthropology: Black Marxism

This course examines 20th century approaches to Marxism through the Black liberation tradition. It focuses on the works of key theorists and writers from Africa and the diaspora, with an emphasis on expanding existing theories to incorporate analyses of gender and sexuality. The course explores political economies and libidinal economies from 19th century enslavement to 21st century mass incarceration.