Politics

              FILE - This Dec. 28, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking to reporters in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington. Republican leaders scramble for votes on a stopgap debt-limit measure that would let the government keep borrowing until at least mid-May, giving up for now on trying to win spending cuts from Democrats in return. But the respite would be only temporary, with major battles still to come between the GOP and President Barack Obama over taxes, spending and deficits. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

Obama’s touts abortion rights, child safety to win women’s votes

Neil Munro
White House Correspondent

President Barack Obama lauded the 1973 Supreme Court decision that largely banned any curbs on early-term abortions, only six days after declaring the nation has an obligation to save each and every human life threatened by violence.

“We reaffirm [the Supreme Court's] historic commitment to protect the health and reproductive freedom of women across this country … [and] we recommit ourselves to supporting women and families in the choices they make and redouble our efforts to promote safe and healthy communities,” he said in a statement Jan. 22.

Obama’s support for abortion clashes with his new effort to portray himself as the protector of kids from armed maniacs, following the horrific massacre of 20 kids in a Connecticut school by a local loner armed with at least two weapons, says Lila Rose, founder of the Live Action pro-life group.

“If you are going to talk about he preciousness of children killed by the violence in Sandy Hook school, we have to recognize preciousness of the child in the womb,” she said.

On Jan. 16, during a White House event in which Obama described his emerging campaign against “gun violence,” the president said the government must go to great lengths to save each human life.

“There is no law or set of laws that can prevent every senseless act of violence completely, no piece of legislation that will prevent every tragedy, every act of evil … [but] if there is even one life that can be saved, then we’ve got an obligation to try.”

He made a similar claim Jan. 14, saying in a press conference that “if there is a step we can take that will save even one child from what happened in Newtown, we should take that step.”

Obama’s gun-related language echoes conservatives’ 40-year protests against the Court’s decision to sideline legislatures.

“Roe is an assault on the very foundation of our country–the principle that life is the most fundamental of all human rights,” said a Jan. 22 statement by Carol Tobias, president of National Right to Life. “Our humanity is not defined by the atrocities that have been committed throughout history, but by the shining light of those who recognize injustice and refuse to be complicit through silence.”

“Today we remember the 55 million human beings who had the most basic right and freedom tragically stolen from them through abortion, the first right of all — the right to life,” said a Jan. 22 statement Rose, who founded Live Action.

“Without the right to life, there are no other rights,” she said.

Obama’s support for the Roe v. Wade decision — which made abortion legal by denying voters or legislators a right to set any significant curbs on doctors’ abortion-related practices — reflects the Democratic Party’s successful efforts to keep the support of single women, women professionals and feminists.

“Today and every day, my Administration continues our efforts to reduce unintended pregnancies, support maternal and child health, and minimize the need for abortion … [and] we recommit ourselves to supporting women and families in the choices they make and redouble our efforts to promote safe and healthy communities,” said the White House’s Jan. 22 statement.

In the 2012 election, Mitt Romney won majority support among married women, but lost heavily among unmarried women, poor women and women with post-graduate degrees.