The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Welch Baltimore pastry gun. Photo: WBFF FOX 45 screenshot Welch Baltimore pastry gun. Photo: WBFF FOX 45 screenshot  

Second-grader suspended for having breakfast pastry shaped like a gun

Yet another student has been suspended for having something that represents a gun, but isn’t actually anything like a real gun.

This time, it was a breakfast pastry.

Josh Welch, a second-grader at Park Elementary School in Baltimore, Maryland, was suspended for two days because his teacher thought he shaped the strawberry, pre-baked toaster pastry into something resembling a gun. WBFF, the FOX affiliate in Baltimore, broke the story.

Welch, an arty kid who has reportedly been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, said his goal was to turn it into a mountain, but that didn’t really materialize, reports Fox News.

“It was already a rectangle. I just kept on biting it and biting it and tore off the top of it and kind of looked like a gun,” he said.

“But it wasn’t,” the seven-year-old astutely added.

The boy’s teacher was not happy with his creation.

“She was pretty mad, and I think I was in big trouble,” Welch told the FOX affiliate.

According to the boy’s father, school officials say Welch also said “Bang, bang” while holding the breakfast pastry.

School officials sent home a letter saying, in part: “One of our students used food to make inappropriate gestures.”

Beyond the letter, school officials offered no further comment on the incident, citing privacy concerns.

“They said they had to suspend Josh for two days, because he used his breakfast pastry and fashioned it as a gun,” the elder Welch told WBFF.

The boy’s father described the events leading up to his son’s suspension as “insanity.”

No one was hurt during the incident, he noted.

“It’s a pastry, you know,” he said.

Josh Welch is adamant that he didn’t say “bang, bang.” He does admit pointing his breakfast pastry sculpture at the ceiling.

This incident is the latest in a growing line of extraordinarily strong reactions by school officials to things students have brought to school — or talked about bringing to school, or eaten at school — that are not anything like real guns.