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Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Dzhokhar Tsarnaev  

The last days of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

The most interesting man in the world right now is Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the suspected Boston Marathon bomber who was captured alive on Friday night.

To satisfy this morbid yet wholly understandable fascination, The Daily Caller offers this primer of generally random facts about the young bombing suspect’s life.

Tsarnaev, 19, was born in 1993 in Kyrgyzstan, reports Yahoo News. He was (and possibly, technically, remains) a sophomore at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, located about an hour south of Boston. He lived on campus, in a dorm room.

Multiple reports suggest that he was failing out of school by Monday, when the Boston Marathon bombing occurred.

He was known on campus as a “pothead” and a huge soccer fan, reports CBS Boston. He was also on the soccer team — or possibly an intramural soccer team — but he failed to attend a practice on Monday and hadn’t been heard from since.

Two students told CBS Boston they had seen Tsarnaev on campus since Monday’s bombing that left three people dead, including an eight-year-old boy. The sightings allegedly occurred on both Tuesday and Wednesday.

One student said he had asked Tsarnaev for a ride back to the Boston area because both students were headed to Cambridge.

Tsarnaev also had a reputation for having abysmal driving skills, according to reports — so much so that some people were hesitant to ride in his vehicle while he was at the wheel.

According to Boston.com, Tsarnaev ran over his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, as he lay wounded in the street. The younger Tsarnaev was driving a vehicle the two brothers had carjacked earlier in the evening.

The bombing suspect’s peers also described him as quiet and reflective. He had no reputation for discussing political issues. As TheDC reports, however, Tsarnaev supported President Obama for re-election last November, according to friends and his Twitter account. (RELATED: One bombing suspect loved pot and Obama, the other was married)

Web users quickly unearthed what appears to be Tsarnaev’s Russian Facebook page. It has seen a deluge of Web traffic since Friday morning.

The page shows that someone used a mobile phone to access it on Friday morning. The top of the page reads “last seen today at 5:04 am.” It also notes that “Djohar has been using the mobile version.”

Tsarnaev could have been fleeing from police at that time, when an intense manhunt was in progress.