Ann Coulter

The problem isn’t just illegal immigration, it’s legal immigration, too

Photo of Ann Coulter
Ann Coulter
Political Commentator

The people of Boston are no longer being terrorized by the Marathon bombers, but amnesty supporters sure are.

On CNN’s “State of the Union” last weekend, Sen. Lindsey Graham’s response to the Boston Marathon bombers being worthless immigrants who hate America — one of whom the FBI cleared even after being tipped off by Russia — was to announce: “The fact that we could not track him has to be fixed.”

Track him? How about not admitting him as an immigrant?

As if it’s a defense, we’re told Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (of the Back Bay Tsarnaevs) were disaffected “losers” — the word used by their own uncle — who couldn’t make it in America. Their father had already returned to Russia. Tamerlan had dropped out of college, been arrested for domestic violence and said he had no American friends. Dzhokhar was failing most of his college courses. All of them were on welfare.

(Dzhokhar was given everything America had to offer, and now he only has one thing in his future to look forward to … a tenured professorship.)

My thought is, maybe we should consider admitting immigrants who can succeed in America, rather than deadbeats.

But we’re not allowed to “discriminate” in favor of immigrants who would be good for America. Instead of helping America, our immigration policies are designed to help other countries solve their internal problems by shipping their losers to us.

The problem isn’t just illegal immigration. I would rather have doctors and engineers sneaking into the country than legally arriving ditch-diggers.

Teddy Kennedy’s 1965 immigration act so dramatically altered the kinds of immigrants America admits that, since 1969, about 85 percent of legal immigrants have come from the Third World. They bring Third World levels of poverty, fertility, illegitimacy and domestic violence with them. When they can’t make it in America, they simply go on welfare and sometimes strike out at Americans.

In addition to the four dead and more than 100 badly wounded victims of the Boston Marathon bombing, let’s consider a few of the many other people who would be alive, but for Kennedy’s immigration law:

– The six Long Island Railroad passengers murdered in 1993 by Jamaican immigrant Colin Ferguson. Before the shooting, Ferguson was unemployed, harassing women on subways, repeatedly bringing lawsuits against police and former employers, applying for workman’s compensation for fake injuries and blaming all his problems on white people. Whom he then decided to murder.

– The two people killed outside CIA headquarters in 1993 by Pakistani illegal immigrant Mir Qazi. He had been working as a driver for a courier company. (It’s nearly impossible to find an American who can drive.)

– Christoffer Burmeister, a 27-year-old musician killed in a mass shooting by Palestinian immigrant Ali Hassan Abu Kamal in 1997 at the Empire State Building. Hassan had immigrated to America with his family two months earlier at age 68. (It’s a smart move to bring in immigrants just in time to pay them Social Security benefits!)

– Bill Cosby’s son, Ennis, killed in 1997 by 18-year-old Ukrainian immigrant Mikhail Markhasev, who had come to this country with his single mother eight years earlier — because we were running short on single mothers.

Markhasev, who had a juvenile record, shot Cosby point-blank for taking too long to produce his wallet. He later bragged about killing a “n*gger.”

– The three people murdered at the Appalachian School of Law in 2002 by Nigerian immigrant Peter Odighizuwa, angry at America because he had failed out of law school. At least it’s understandable why our immigration policies would favor a 43-year-old law student. It’s so hard to get Americans to go to law school these days!