Education
Feds out of Dixie sticker for sale at League of the South website (one-page screenshot, cropped) Feds out of Dixie sticker for sale at League of the South website (one-page screenshot, cropped)  

Secessionists were going to teach Constitution class at Ohio high school

A prosperous suburban enclave in southwestern Ohio is apparently some budding hotbed of Southern secessionism.

The latest incident occurred Thursday night when Sonny Thomas, the self-proclaimed president of SpringboroTeaParty.com, addressed a district school board meeting. In his speech, Thomas reportedly defended the League of the South, an openly secessionist group. The fierce foe of the New World Order also climaxed his remarks by defiantly revealing a Confederate flag.

Jason Lewis, a local parent who was also present at the raucous board meeting, described Thomas’s monologue as “odd, stream-of-conscious babbling.”

“He ended his speech by unfurling a Confederate flag and asking, ‘Are you offended?’” Lewis told The Daily Caller.

Thomas also went over his allotted time, Lewis noted.

Like Thomas, Lewis was on the list of prearranged speakers. He spoke, just after Thomas, concerning his dissatisfaction with the board’s handling of a looming teachers strike and a recently cancelled class on the Constitution (see below).

Unlike Thomas, Lewis was later asked to leave the meeting when he later spoke over Kelly Kohls, the board president, reports the Dayton Daily News. Lewis and Kohls sparred over the text used in a history class.

A few weeks ago, The Daily Caller reported on a kerfuffle in Springboro that appeared to be a garden-variety dustup over religion in school. A group of parents had protested because the school district was promoting a voluntary 12-week summer course for students and adults on the U.S. Constitution. Complaints included that the class was “tea party leaning” and overtly religious.

“I googled some of the names — some of the groups that are teaching the classes — and of course my assumptions were correct in finding out it was a religion-based class,” prying parent Jenny Nijak told NBC affiliate WLWT at the time. (RELATED: Parents angry because religion may get mentioned in optional summer Constitution class)

The course would have occurred at Springboro High School (in Room #108).

On July 3, the school district called off the course, according to WHIO-TV. It has since been relocated to a church in somewhat nearby Clearcreek Township, and will begin next week.

The religious nature and constitutional permissibility of the canceled courses notwithstanding, another interesting issue is also afoot. The creators and, apparently, the teachers of this public school-promoted course on the Constitution are bona fide, dyed-in-the-wool secessionists.