The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

Russian Orthodox Church video game lets you slay Pussy Riot members

Pussy Riot video game. Photo: screenshot via Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Pussy Riot video game. Photo: screenshot via Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty  

At a Russian Orthodox Church-sponsored youth festival in Moscow last week, organizers showcased a video game that allows players to snuff out a continuous stream of members of the feminist punk rock protest group Pussy Riot.

The game is called “Don’t Let Pussy Riot into the Cathedral,” reports Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

Players use a gaudy Orthodox cross to slaughter women clad in balaclavas of various bright colors. They are carrying guitars and shaking their fists angrily. They are bum-rushing a cartoonish-looking white church topped with a yellow dome.

Pussy Rioters who are not extinguished enter the church. The first few end up on top of it, now with horns and pitchforks. If too many of them enter the church, it eventually falls into disarray. Grim, grey clouds appear in the background. A blackbird shows up on the dome, and the game is over.

There’s also some interesting symbolism in the game including carrying guitars, a large black SUV and some kind of kiosk with a red banner that reads, in English, “SALES 70%.” The words in the game are otherwise in Russian.

Pussy Riot’s song “Punk Prayer for Putin” plays gratingly in the background.

Aleksandr Davydkina, a youth festival representative, said the goal of the game is to appeal to young Russians.

“There are young people who do not have a relationship [with religion] and do not wish to talk about the church,” he told Interfax. “But when they see this game, we have the chance to talk to them about what is happening at the church and why it is necessary.”

In February 2012, some members of Pussy Riot played the song “Punk Prayer for Putin” in Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral.  The words appeal to the Virgin Mary to free Russia from the grasp of President Vladimir Putin.

As a result of their actions, three of them received prison sentences.

The game reportedly appeared at the youth festival on July 11. Since then, neither the Orthodox Church nor anyone associated with Pussy Riot has made any public comment.

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