Tech
              From left, Deputy Attorney General James Cole; National Security Agency (NSA) Deputy Director Chris Inglis; NSA Director Gen. Keith B. Alexander; Deputy FBI Director Sean Joyce; and Robert Litt, general counsel to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 18, 2013, before the House Intelligence Committee hearing regarding NSA surveillance. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
              From left, Deputy Attorney General James Cole; National Security Agency (NSA) Deputy Director Chris Inglis; NSA Director Gen. Keith B. Alexander; Deputy FBI Director Sean Joyce; and Robert Litt, general counsel to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 18, 2013, before the House Intelligence Committee hearing regarding NSA surveillance. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)   

Tor usage doubles since NSA PRISM scandal

Usage of a semi-secret U.S. government-created Internet network increased in recent days amid continuing revelations about secret U.S. government spy programs.

Internet users concerned about their privacy have increased their usage of the anonymous online network Tor since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden first revealed the NSA’s Internet surveillance program.

Tor, developed by the U.S. Navy, is used by governments, activists, journalists and dissidents to conceal their online activities from prying eyes.

Tor usage, however, is not entirely anonymous. Internet Service Providers are able to detect Tor usage on their networks and trace it back to the Internet user.

Activity on the network began to rise on Aug. 20; two days prior, David Miranda — Guardian journalist and blogger Glenn Greenwald’s spouse — was detained by U.K. police at London’s Heathrow Airport for nine hours.

As of Wednesday, user activity on the network doubled what it was three months ago.

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