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              In this photo taken Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in the White House library in Washington. "There are enough votes in the House of Representatives to make sure that the government reopens today,” Obama said. “And I’m pretty willing to bet that there are enough votes in the House of Representatives right now to make sure that the United States doesn’t end up being a deadbeat,” he said. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Report: Glitchy Healthcare.gov cost taxpayers more than $634 million to build

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Caroline May
Political Reporter

With critics panning the Obamacare exchange website Healthcare.gov for its myriad technological problems, a tech news site has surfaced with a dollar estimate for what the glitchy website actually cost taxpayers.

According to Digital Trends, CGI Federal received $634,320,919 to construct Healthcare.gov — or more than the amount spent building Linkedin ($200 million) and Spotify ($288 million) combined.

The site also cost more than it took to initially create Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, according to the report.

The Department of Health and Human Services did not respond to The Daily Caller’s request for comment.

The expense appears even larger when compared with the amount the company was originally slated to receive, as in 2011 CGI Federal was contracted to build the site for about $93 million.

This news comes as Fox News reports that officials in the White House might have known prior to the launch that the site was not ready and the government still has not released information on how many people have successfully enrolled in the federal exchanges.

Thursday, an Associated Press-GFK poll revealed that seven percent of Americans reported that somebody in their household has tried to sign up for the exchange, however among those who experimented with the exchanges, just 10 percent of those who attempted to sign up were able to buy health insurance.

According to the AP, about 75 percent of Americans polled said they experienced problems trying to sign up.

The administration has noted that open enrollment is just beginning and there is still time for Americans to enroll.

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