The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
              FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, and Senate Budget Committee Chair Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., arrive at a Congressional Budget Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of last month’s partial government shutdown, House and Senate negotiators are trying to reach a budget agreement for next year and beyond. One goal is to soften automatic spending cuts that started to take effect this year known as sequestration. Those cuts are scheduled to get deeper in the coming year. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
              FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, and Senate Budget Committee Chair Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., arrive at a Congressional Budget Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of last month’s partial government shutdown, House and Senate negotiators are trying to reach a budget agreement for next year and beyond. One goal is to soften automatic spending cuts that started to take effect this year known as sequestration. Those cuts are scheduled to get deeper in the coming year. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)   

Congress: Still more worried about elections than doing what’s right

Photo of Dustin Siggins
Dustin Siggins
Washington Correspondent, lifesitenews.com

When it comes to the budget, those who look to Washington for leadership and solutions are like Charlie Brown – constantly hoping this time Lucy won’t move the football.

In 2010, the President and Congress kicked the can down the road to see if the Simpson-Bowles Commission could get the job done instead. It failed. In 2011, Congress foisted its job onto the so-called super-committee, which was supposed to come up with at least a modest bargain on deficit reduction. It ignominiously collapsed a few months later, leaving sequestration to take effect. And within a year, members of both parties were trying to overturn the modest deficit reduction components of the sequester.

In October of this year, Congress and the president tried again, with the Senate and House Budget Committee chairs leading the traditional “conference committee,” in which the respective chambers of Congress work to compromise between the differing goals of the Senate and the House. Unfortunately, all evidence indicates that kicking the can down the road to avoid tough pre-election decisions will supersede the goal of preventing America’s forthcoming fiscal crisis.

According to Politico, after nearly two months of discussions, Democrats and Republicans on the conference committee may agree to a few modest changes to current policy: spending approximately $30 billion more than sequestration allows, and raising fees for airline security, auctioning broadband spectrum, and modifying federal employee retirement plans.

While both parties are pretending these changes are worth cheering, in fact they are signs of yet another failure by Congress. Rather than address the nation’s spending problem, avoiding a bigger discussion has everything to do with the 2014 elections.

For Democrats, spending $30 billion more than sequestration allows them to brag they prevented sequestration from taking effect in 2014. It also allows them to claim they compromised on their original goal of spending $91 billion more than sequestration.

The fees are a bonus for Democrats, who will tell liberal constituents they got increased federal revenue.

For Republicans, including the not-so-conservative Paul Ryan (who chairs the House Budget Committee, and is the lead Republican in the discussions) spending $30 billion more than sequestration allows them to say they stopped Democrats from spending as much as the latter wanted. The fees let them say tax hikes were avoided, even though fees still take more money out of the pockets of the American people.