The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Sally Fronsman-Cecil poses with her possessions in her Topeka, Kansas home, in this undated photograph. Fronsman-Cecil was always inclined to have a cluttered home, but she went into the "downward spiral" life of a hoarder after her husband died in 1998. Clothes, food, cardboard boxes, magazines, plastic bins and other items pile up in her house. Her living room is impassible; her kitchen counters heaped with dishes and food. (REUTERS/Kevin Murphy) Sally Fronsman-Cecil poses with her possessions in her Topeka, Kansas home, in this undated photograph. Fronsman-Cecil was always inclined to have a cluttered home, but she went into the "downward spiral" life of a hoarder after her husband died in 1998. Clothes, food, cardboard boxes, magazines, plastic bins and other items pile up in her house. Her living room is impassible; her kitchen counters heaped with dishes and food. (REUTERS/Kevin Murphy)  

Delaware has created a ridiculously unusual task force

Hoarding, now recognized as a disorder by the American Psychiatric Association, is estimated to affect five percent of Americans, or roughly 15 million.

And the state of Delaware is deciding to do something about it. With a potential 45,000 Delaware residents affected, it has decided to create a government-funded task force to look into this, Delaware Online reports.

“There’s no one of us who can solve the problem by ourselves,” Kathleen Weiss of the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services said. “It goes across many facets of the community. That’s why we feel the task force is necessary.”

So far, the plan of action is to create an advisory panel to discuss who would be good to create the task force. Once that is determined, the task force will hopefully create support groups for hoarders and continue to discuss how to change things.

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